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Musings & Meanderings: How to set aside time for writing, priming your brain, writing by hand, abandoned houses, the color white, hybrid forms, and more

By Leslie Lindsay

A curated newsletter on the literary life, featuring ‘4 questions,’ a mini-author interview, reading & listening recommendations, where to submit, more

Leslie Lindsay|Always with a Book

~MUSINGS & MEANDERINGS~

Hello, Friends!

I recently went on a writing retreat/workshop. Before I left, a thoughtful grandfatherly-type man in my yoga class, asked, “So do you know what you want to work on while you’re there?”

“Yep,” I nodded.

It seems knowing what you want to write is half the battle. The workshop/retreat had other plans for me and I got completely thrown from my intentions. So, here’s a little cheat sheet I came up with to help YOU:

Strategize what you want to write. 

If you’ve got a work-in-progress (WIP), do you know which chapters you want to work on? I made notecards of topics I wanted to explore and brought those. Also leave my writing sessions a little unfinished so I am still mulling over the last line(s) when I walk away from my writing desk. Maybe you hope to ‘just’ draft or scribble or daydream. If that feels like a good fit, do a little pre-contemplation on what that might consist of.

Commit to what you want to accomplish. 

Can you say to yourself:

“I am going to finish this proposal/essay by the time I leave the workshop?”

Or:

“I am going to write a new poem every day for that amount of time (say, two weeks). Or: I am going to commit to editing the first third of my book.”

How about:

“I’m going to write one snapshot of no more than 750-1200 words/day about [topic] so that by the end of the week/month 7/30(!) snapshots.”

Say it to yourself or a friend. There is a real energy to uttering those words out loud. There’s real power in writing it out, too, and POSTING where you’ll see it everyday (I’m talking your fridge, door, dashboard, pantry; not social media).

Photo by Jess Bailey Designs on Pexels.com

Carve out time in your day. 

Do you know when you’re going to write? I write in the afternoons. This practice started when my kids were little and “napping,” (which they didn’t, but we pretended), and it’s sort of been ingrained into my creative conscious. Saturday afternoons work for me, too. Can you identify which part of your day, or day of the week works best for you? Perhaps glance at your calendar in advance and make sure you can clear some time for the commitment. Claiming that time for yourself is empowering.

[Tip: You can start small. Maybe go with 20 minutes and see what happens. I have a feeling 20 will turn into 40 and so forth. You might surprise yourself.]

Find your spot. 

If you got some good writing done once in a particular cafe, maybe you need to become its best customer. For me, it’s a circulating family of coffee shops, but also my desk at home. Can you ask your roommate/spouse/partner if you can have a quiet hour in the kitchen to yourself every day? Does the babysitter need to stay an hour longer? Maybe it’s just identifying a desk in the furthest reaches of your local library and making sure you get there early enough to nab it. Knowing where you’ll be every day to write can be a stabilizing force and prepares your mind for the work.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Gather the supplies you need. 

What objects inspire you either intellectually or emotionally? I have several friends who claim to be neat-nicks and cannot do any kind of writing until their desk is tidy. Another likes to purchase a brand-new notebook just for the project. I need a black Pilot G-2 07 pen to do my work and unlined paper. Sometimes I need to read something for inspiration. Do you need a special drink or music? View?

Here’s what I do:

I like paper. I like pens. I must doodle and feel the flow of ink. Writing digitally might be more ‘green,’ (but maybe not…there’s battery and electricity involved; those are resources), or efficient (honestly, the words flow just as fast, maybe faster for me if I go longhand). I truly believe sitting down and collecting one’s thoughts in a handwritten fashion. (Studies have shown your brain operates differently when you handwrite versus when you type.) Isn’t that cool and miraculous? I tend to be more experimental when I handwrite. That’s because, I think, the inner editor isn’t there. No blinking cursor that has you mentally/subconsciously analyzing your choices. Also, there’s that thing that if you have committed it to ‘print’, meaning type–it’s harder to tweak later.

None of this is required, of course, just meant to trigger some helpful thinking in advance. Showing up feeling ready to work/write is the real goal. Entering a project with confidence and enthusiasm is important! What I wish for you most is that you feel nourished and as if you can take chances as a writer. The activity of writing is so much BIGGER than being ‘good’ or ‘publishable’ or whatever, it’s a spiritual endeavor.

How’s it going? Respond here in a comment, or find me on InstagramTwitter, or Facebook.

xx,

~Leslie : )

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

Photo by Nur Yilmaz on Pexels.com

What I’m Distracted By:

  • The power and excitement of small presses.
  • Abandoned homes and lumbering piles of salvage. How it’s sort of a relation to hoarding but not.
  • How books might be a communion with ghosts and God and I wonder if they are alive, but also simultaneously dead.
  • Space. In real life and on the page. How openness invites questions.
  • The color white. Is it a color or devoid of one? Is it clean or blank? Sterile? Other white things: teeth, bones, eye sclera, snow, paper.
  • Hybrid forms of writing. Hermit crab essay. Playing on the page.
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Recently-published Stuff You Might Have Missed:

CNF/Hybrid Work:

CNF/Memoir:

  • “Making Space: Cicadas & My Mother,” by Leslie Lindsay, CNF in ANMLY

Fiction:

Author Interviews:

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

You are reading Musings & Meanderings, a consistently inconsistent weekly newsletter about the literary life from Leslie Lindsay, and home of an archive of bestselling and debut author interviews. I’m also on twitter and instagram. I try to answer comments as best I canFeel free to find my book suggestions on bookshop.org, and also check out the authors I’ve hosted in in-depth interviews HERE.

L.Lindsay archives.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Hrvoje Abraham Miliu0107eviu0107 on Pexels.com

Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more HERE.

Musings & Meanderings: Leslie Kirk Campbell talks about her debut collection in our ‘4 Questions’ chat; hint: memory, time, bodies. Plus, how to pick your creative project, mental health awareness, where to submit, links to interviews with Maud Newton, Kim Adrian, and new CNF

By Leslie Lindsay

A curated newsletter on the literary life, featuring ‘4 questions,’ a mini-author interview, reading & listening recommendations, where to submit, more

Leslie Lindsay|Always with a Book

~MUSINGS & MEANDERINGS~

Hello, Friends!

Folks always wonder how to know if they’re making the right choice creatively when there are so many possibilities. I get it. There are a million ways a project could go, a million first lines, each offer a unique structure, too. We must move past indecision and lean into our work. Choose your project. Choose your ideas. Chose your sentences. Choose your ending. It’s not easy. Did anyone say it would be easy? They were wrong.

How’s it going? Respond here in a comment, or find me on InstagramTwitter, or Facebook.

xx,

~Leslie : )

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

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What I’m Distracted By

  • This really resonated…

“[My wife] was a teaching assistant for kids with disabilities and they had put a butterfly sanctuary in their classroom. … She said that in order for the butterflies to learn how to fly they need to flap and flap for a while. It all looks like wasted time and energy but they actually need that struggle to learn and grow… Every time we put a word on the page, we’re flapping our wings. It may not look like much, but in that challenging and somewhat directionless process, we are figuring out how to fly with our words.”

—Nurse and health writer Gillian May, who we recently profiled in Creators Hub

  • This review of An Encyclopedia of Bending Time by Kristin Keane, this is a  a hermit crab memoir with alphabetized entries—much like that of an actual encyclopedia complete with “See alsos” at the end of each entry. 
  • [See also–like how I did that?!]–check out my interview with Kim Adrian, about her memoir, The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet, written in a very similar style]
  • May is (Maternal) Mental Health Awareness Month and sadly, my mother died by suicide in May 2015. She struggled with severe mental illness for most of her life, but it really peaked when she was about 30. If you are a survivor of suicide loss, you know just how complex this grief is. Dr. Noam Schneck at Columbia University is conducting a study, Survive Together. You must be in the first 15 months of grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide to qualify, but please consider reaching out to him.
  • Looking for audiobooks about mental health? Penguin Random House has got you covered! Plus, join them in a special mini-podcast, This is the Author, in which you can learn some behind-the-scenes insights about the book and their process. Featuring actress Lilly Singh, Terry Crews, and Charles Booker. Learn about the hard personal work through self-doubt, insecurities, and adversity that served as inspiration for Be a TriangleTough, and From the Hood to the Holler

If you’re struggling and your life is in danger, please call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255

1-800-273-TALK

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

NEW! Four Questions: A mini-interview series

Leslie Kirk Campbell

THE MAN WITH EIGHT PAIRS OF LEGS: Stories

Winner of the Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction, this collection of short stories is a study in compassion and in passion, a must-read for our times.

Photo credit: Leslie Lindsay @leslielindsay1 | #booknerd
  1. Without responding in complete sentences, what would you say THE MAN WITH EIGHT PAIRS OF LEGS is about?

Leslie Kirk Campbell :

*BODIES PHYSICALLY MARKED BY MEMORIES : The way our bodies hold our pasts, visibly – bruises, scars, tattoos – and invisibly over a lifetime, or through generations. How this guides us. How this makes us feel as we sit in a chair or walk down the street.

*RISKING EVERYTHING TO ESCAPE THE CARDS WE’VE BEEN DEALT : Longing for something other than our current circumstances; courting danger in our efforts to escape

2. Where did you write THE MAN WITH EIGHT PAIRS OF LEGS? Do you have any special writing routines or rituals? Do they change with each project, or remain constant over time?

Leslie Kirk Campbell :

I work best when I can work intensely for hours on end. I teach on my own schedule so I can write for days and into the night – at home, now that my sons are grown; at an old convent across the Golden Gate Bridge, and at residencies and self-made retreats. I often start my writing day by reading a writer I esteem, and then I take off, inspired, on my own writing projects.

“History and memory crosscut through The Man with Eight Pairs of Legs in a gorgeous weave. These are marvelous, stirring stories, sometimes sexy, sometimes harrowing, somehow both timeless and timely. Campbell writes with great depth, patience, wisdom, and beauty.”

— Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light You Cannot See

3. If you weren’t writing, you would be…

Leslie Kirk Campbell :

Time disappears when I am in my backyard garden, muddying my hands planting, trimming and weeding, scarring my hands with rose thorns, then taking a few moments to sit in the sun and delight in my collaboration with nature. I read. I relish teaching the Art of Languaging. I have heart-felt dates with those I love.

4. What book did you recently read that you can’t stop thinking about?

Leslie Kirk Campbell :

I am particularly interested in books that take me into cultures and places I know little about. A recent favorite is:

Sharks in the Time of Saviors, a novel by Kawai Strong Washburn, with its original and beautiful conveying of poverty and family within the context of old Hawaiian culture, hard realities combined with myth and magic.

Currently reading, Hillbilly Elegy, by J.D. Vance, an honest documentation of Appalachian poverty and culture, giving social and historical context to feelings of defeat and neglect experienced by white blue-collar families in the US

BOTH ARE ESSENTIAL READING.

I also highly recommend the following novels recently read, all powerfully written:

Hurricane Season by Fernanda Melchor

The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obrecht

Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart

The Confession of Copeland Cane by Keenan Norris


Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

Get a copy of THE MAN WITH EIGHT PAIRS OF LEGS here.

Published by Sarabande Books, available everywhere February 1, 2022

Visit Leslie Kirk Campbell‘s website for more information, and to access a link to a playlist inspired by the stories.

Recently-published Stuff You Might Have Missed:

  • “Breaking Ground,” by Leslie Lindsay, flash fiction in The Tiny Journal
  • “Making Space: Cicadas & My Mother,” by Leslie Lindsay, CNF in ANMLY

Calls for submission:

  • First Person Singular is new and offered as a side-gig to Memoir Monday. They are able to publish one essay/month and seeking 1500-2000 word essays from diverse writers who have experienced difficult things through the lens of absurdity. Finished work only, pitch2sari@gmail.com
  • Vestal Review is open to flash now through May 31.
  • Emerge Literary Journal is open to strictly flash and free form work, in all categories.
  • Narratively is looking for untold, first-person ‘human’ stories that are immersive and cinematic–memoir, love, secret lives, high school sports, photojournalism.
  • Longridge Review will open June 1 for the Barnhill Prize in CNF with Sonja Livingston judging.
  • Boston Review is reading for its poetry and short story contests, with a free entry period until May 31 for writers in certain locations and/or writers facing economic hardship.
Photo by Nur Yilmaz on Pexels.com

You are reading Musings & Meanderings, a consistently inconsistent weekly newsletter about the literary life from Leslie Lindsay, and home of an archive of bestselling and debut author interviews. I’m also on twitter and instagram. I try to answer comments as best I can. Feel free to find my book suggestions on bookshop.org, and also check out the authors I’ve hosted in in-depth interviews HERE.

L.Lindsay archives.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by FOX on Pexels.com

Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more HERE.

Musings & Meanderings: Mindy Uhrlaub on hope, friendship & being a neatnick; a give-a-way for SPEAKING OF APRXIA, reading recommendations, calls for submissions, obsessions, more

By Leslie Lindsay

A curated newsletter on the literary life, featuring ‘4 questions,’ reading & listening recommendations, where to submit, more

Leslie Lindsay|Always with a Book

~MUSINGS & MEANDERINGS~

Hello, Friends!

I am in the process of doing some deep work. Some of which is about reflecting and thinking about next steps, wrapping up an end-of-an-era, being open to new ideas, people, and places in life. It’s sort of been a struggle, but what transformation isn’t?

Photo by le vy on Pexels.com

“Transformation isn’t sweet and bright. It’s a dark and murky, painful pushing. An unraveling of the untruths you’ve carried in your body. A practice in facing your own created demons. A complete uprooting, before becoming.”

Victoria Erickson

How’s it going? Respond here in a comment, or find me on InstagramTwitter, or Facebook.

xx,

~Leslie : )

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

It’s a bittersweet end: my fabulous longtime publisher, Woodbine House, will be closing their doors in June. This is a pandemic-driven decision. Woodbine House has been churning out top special-needs resources for 37 years, including SPEAKING OF APRAXIA.

The good news? All of their books are 50%, while supplies last.

If you–or someone you know–could benefit from the book, the time is now.

What I’m Distracted By

  • Renee Gladman‘s PLANS FOR SENTENCES. In fact, all of her work makes me feel all tingly inside. Something about architecture and words and art colliding…yep, totally my jam. Find her on IG @prosearchitectures.
  • These basset hounds. Did you know we have one? I sort of think heaven is a warm space with a basket of bassets and calorie-free cake. With good icing. Which my bassett would lick. In fact, she’s right at my feet this very minute. Find these dudes and dudettes on IG @ozarksbassets.
  • Remember to find me, too. @leslielindsay1. I post cool stuff you might not get here. Just sayin.’

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

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NEW! Four Questions: A mini-interview series

Mindy Uhrlaub

UNNATURAL RESOURCES


Photo credit: Leslie Lindsay @leslielindsay1
  1. Without responding in complete sentences, what would you say UNNATURAL RESOURCES is about?

Mindy Uhrlaub:

A young heroine who becomes a symbol of hope in the worst place in the world to be female. Making friends in hostile environments.  The love between a mother and a daughter. Girl power!

Get a copy HERE

2. Where did you write UNNATURAL RESOURCES? Do you have any special writing routines or rituals? Do they change with each project, or remain constant over time?

Mindy Uhrlaub:

I wrote the early drafts at home, when my sons were napping. I rewrote later versions at Ragdale for the Arts and at writers’ getaways to  Sonoma with my writing partners. I’m a neatnick, so have trouble focusing at a cluttered desk. Once my writing surface is clean, I’m good to go.

3. If you weren’t writing, you would be…

Mindy Uhrlaub:

Miserable!

4. What book did you recently read that you can’t stop thinking about?

Mindy Uhrlaub:

My book club recently read Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. While it wasn’t my favorite book of all time, it really stuck with me.

Get your copy of Unnatural Resources HERE or where books are sold. Check out Mindy’s website for more information.

Recently-published Stuff You Might Have Missed:

  • “Breaking Ground,” by Leslie Lindsay, flash fiction in The Tiny Journal
  • “Making Space: Cicadas & My Mother,” by Leslie Lindsay, CNF in ANMLY

Calls for submission:

  • Longridge Review will open June 1 for the Barnhill Prize in CNF with Sonja Livingston judging.
  • The Emerging Writer’s Contest is open at Ploughshares until May 15. Submissions of poetry and prose are welcomed from writers who not yet published a book.
  • Creative Nonfiction’s True Story is open for submissions until May 15. This is a great place to find a home for longform pieces or standalone sections of a memoir-in-progress (5,000 to 10,000 words).
  • Boston Review is reading for its poetry and short story contests, with a free entry period until May 31 for writers in certain locations and/or writers facing economic hardship.
Photo by Lum3n on Pexels.com

Coming soon:

A conversation with Kim Adrian, author of TWENTY-SEVENTH LETTER OF THE ALPHABET to appear in The Florida Review. This one is unique from a structure and theme perspective.

Also! An interview with Marie Myung-Ok Lee in The Millions about her novel, THE EVENING HERO, available in May from Simon & Schuster.

Later: In Conversation with Maud Newton, author of the highly-anticipated ANCESTOR TROUBLE, to appear in Hippocampus Magazine, likely in May.

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction in this space as well.

All images credit: @leslielindsay1

There’s more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling.

What I’m reading:

I just read and loved Danielle Henderson’s THE UGLY CRY, which is hilarious and tragic and empowering, all steeped in 1980s growing-up stuff, which I loved and related to immensely, although our stories are very different. Then! I started THE CHILDREN ON THE HILL by Jennifer McMahon, because: 1978 and houses and psychiatry and ghosts/monsters, and how all of that is so my heart.

What I’m listening to:

People. I’ve had a full social calendar of invites for lunch and coffee. It’s a ‘scrolling world’ these days; sometimes we just need a ‘real’ ear to bend, an old-fashioned cup of coffee, the human touch. Time. Undivided attention. Two humans sharing their hearts. I’ve done a lot of listening lately. It’s about hearing the subtext, the space between.

L.Lindsay archives.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Mike on Pexels.com

Let’s walk this bookish path together.

THANK YOU!!

Some of you have been reading my reviews, interviews, and meanderings for more than a decade now. That’s huge and I am so humbled. Thanks for being here.

Connect with me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more HERE.

Creative-health check-in, Erika Krouse on TELL ME EVERYTHING, apraxia news, diversions, recently-published work, what I’m reading and listening to, calls for submissions, more

By Leslie Lindsay

Remember last week’s Musings & Meanderings?

Photo by Akshar Dave on Pexels.com

You can’t be everything to everyone everyday.

Are you remembering to:

Rest. Read. Nap. Write. Spend Time in Nature. Surround Yourself with Nurturing Souls?

Let me know how it’s going. Respond here in a comment, or find me on InstagramTwitter, or Facebook.

xoxoxo

~Leslie : )

There’s more to this newsletter…keep scrolling!

It’s a bittersweet end: my fabulous longtime publisher, Woodbine House, will be closing their doors in June. This is a pandemic-driven decision. Woodbine House has been churning out top special-needs resources for 37 years, including SPEAKING OF APRAXIA.

The good news? All of their books are 50%, while supplies last.

The bittersweet news? SPEAKING OF APRAXIA is sold-out, at least from the publisher’s website.

But! You can still get it, while supplies last on Amazon, maybe Barnes & Noble. Bookshop.org is a possibility, too.

We are looking at other options, too, for it to remain in-print, but that might be awhile to come to fruition. If you–or someone you know–could benefit from the book, the time is now.

What I’m Distracted By

NEW! Four Questions: A mini-interview series

Erika Krouse on her March 2022 release, Tell Me Everything: The Story of a Private Investigation:

Photo credit: L.Lindsay @leslielindsay1 on Instagram
  1. Without responding in complete sentences, what would you say TELL ME EVERYTHING is about?

EK: Justice, for sure. Also PI work and technique, sexual assault and recovery, college football, corruption in higher education, Title IX and law, Colorado, fighting, anecdotal PI history, nature, ethical dilemma, childhood trauma, some psychology and neuroscience, and there’s also a love story and some sex work here and there. PI stew.

2. Where did you write TELL ME EVERYTHING? Do you have any special writing routines or rituals? Do they change with each project, or remain constant over time?

E.K.: I always write at my computer because I can’t read my handwriting. I outlined, wrote, and revised Tell Me Everything in record time for me (15 months), because I was obsessed. I wrote for 11-16 hours on my “writing days” W-Sa-Su, usually from 7am until 10 or 11 at night. I had to do my other work M-Tu-Th-Fr, so on my “non-writing days” I still wrote for 4-8 hours every day after finishing work because the ideas had piled up. I didn’t take any days off until the book was done. By the end, I was a twitching mess.

I don’t think I can work at that breakneck pace again, although I will continue to outline a book before writing it—that saved me a few years, I think. I tend to chafe at rituals, but I know many writers who use them successfully. I think it’s important to tailor your writing practice to your personality, not vice versa. Anyway, writing is its own ritual, right?

3. If you weren’t writing, you would be…

E.K.: I have no idea. Here be dragons.

But I do other things as well. I have an independent editing practice, consulting with novelists, memoirists, short story writers, and essayists. I teach/mentor at the Book Project at Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver. I make unsuccessful forays into music composition, karate, hiking, dog-wrangling, and ceramics when there isn’t a pandemic. But I’m still always thinking about a story I’m working on. I don’t write every day right now, but it’s terrifying to think about not writing at all.

4. What book did you recently read that you can’t stop thinking about?

E.K.: Girlhood, by Melissa Febos. I had read an essay or two from the book when it came out, but I recently read/reread the whole thing in two days. It’s astonishing, an important and gripping piece of work.

[Leslie’s note: I promise, this wasn’t planned! Complete coincidence we both happened to rave about Melissa Febos. Are your ears burning, Melissa?!]

Erika Krouse is the author of Come Up and See Me Sometime, a New York Times Notable Book, and Contenders, a finalist for the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award. Erika’s fiction has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Ploughshares, One Story, and more. She teaches creative writing at the Lighthouse Writers Workshop and lives in Colorado. Her debut memoir, Tell Me Everything, has been optioned for TV adaptation by Playground Entertainment.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Stuff You Might Have Missed:

  • “Breaking Ground,” by Leslie Lindsay, flash fiction published in The Tiny Journal
  • “Making Space: Cicadas & My Mother,” by Leslie Lindsay, CNF published in ANMLY

Calls for submission

  • Visual Verse: An Anthology of Art & Words will have their new prompt May 1-15. The idea: generate a piece of writing from whatever image they select. One hour, 5-200 words. They only publish 100 per month.
  • The LitUp Fellowship, part of Reese Witherspoon’s book club, is open for new applications. It’s for underrepresented women writers who are creating adult or young adult fiction.
  • The Emerging Writer’s Contest is open at Ploughshares until May 15. Submissions of poetry and prose are welcomed from writers who not yet published a book.
  • Creative Nonfiction’s True Story is open for submissions until May 15. This is a great place to find a home for longform pieces or standalone sections of a memoir-in-progress (5,000 to 10,000 words).
  • Boston Review is reading for its poetry and short story contests, with a free entry period until May 31 for writers in certain locations and/or writers facing economic hardship.
Photo by Tirachard Kumtanom on Pexels.com

How to Get an Agent:

Recently, I was asked: “How do you get an agent?”

I don’t have all the answers, and everyone’s experience is different, but here are a few thoughts: Some find their agent at a literary convention or workshop. Others have an agent approach them (what a dream), should they read their work in a lit journal or a contest entry. (‘winners get published and agent review.’)

Other tips for finding an agent:

Read the acknowledgements section of books like yours/your friends and see who their agent is (often mentioned if they’re a good one), QueryTracker (I think it’s free/online database), reading Writer’s Digest and Poets & Writers (I like the ‘first line’ column in P&W. They almost always list the editor/agent/publicist for a new/forthcoming title and if the title/first line catch your attention, then the agent might be a good fit for your/friend’s work, too). 

I kept a big honking spreadsheet of the agency, agent’s name, what they are requesting for submissions (every agent varies–some want a synopsis, first chapter, first three chapters, first 30 pages, bio, first born, your mother’s wedding gown…haha! It’s always different), initial date of contact, date they responded, what they said, etc. You want to read carefully and track all you send. I made Mondays “Submission Mondays.” It was my goal to send 10 queries every Monday. I made a list–and started scratching them off. It takes YEARS!! At least it did for me. 

Coming soon:

A conversation with Kim Adrian, author of TWENTY-SEVENTH LETTER OF THE ALPHABET to appear in The Florida Review. This one is unique from a structure and theme perspective.

Also! An interview with Marie Myung-Ok Lee in The Millions about her novel, THE EVENING HERO, available in May from Simon & Schuster.

Later: In Conversation with Maud Newton, author of the highly-anticipated ANCESTOR TROUBLE, to appear in Hippocampus Magazine, likely in May.

And…a conversation with Jokha Alaharthi, author of BITTER ORANGE TREE: A Novel in Adroit Journal.

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction in this space as well.

All images credit: @leslielindsay1

There’s more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling.

What I’m reading:

The latest issue of Poets & Writers and also Family Tree Magazine. There’s a recent copy of The Missouri Review in my kitchen, too. And I’ll get to it.

What I’m listening to:

Olly Murs. I just wanna dance and sing when this guy pops onto my Spotify.

My inner voice and intuition. You know how sometimes the universe just ‘calls’ you? Well, that’s happening. Sometimes the world brings you things–you’re destined for and there’s something like that right now in my life. Also, in yoga, there’s a mudra about focus, patience, self-confidence, and intuition. It’s about mindfulness. I’m trying to keep all of that at the forefront.

L.Lindsay archives.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more HERE.

Creative-Care is Self-Care: Insights Gleaned from my Time in Guatemala, plus what I’m working on, upcoming interviews, recently published fiction, more

Photo credit: L.Lindsay Join me on Instagram @leslielindsay #booknerd #alwayswithabook

~WHAT I LEARNED IN GUATEMALA~

I recently returned from a writing workshop/retreat in Guatemala. Let me just say this: the scenery was stunning. The location and people were warm, colorful, and in most cases: inspiring.

Reflecting on my time there has generated this list of things I wanted to be sure to share.

The idea of a retreat is to:

Renew, recharge, reconnect.

We’ve been running ninety-to-nothing for a long time now. We’re pandemic-weary, covid-fatigued, and anxious to connect. A retreat should afford us the opportunity to do that.

Self-care might be a big buzz word these days, but…

What about creative care?

We must take care of our creative person, the vessel who does all of this inventing.

My Reiki therapist recently noted my sacral area (the seat of creativity) was ‘ping-pinging’ with activity, but was eclipsed by something dark–a sheathe. That’s a problem. That darkness…well, it needs to be lightened. Her suggestion?

Meditation.

It doesn’t have to be long or involved. 5-10 minutes is all. A deep breath. A few moments alone. Releasing energy actually allows more to bubble up. We are a conduit of activity; we channel creativity through ourselves to make art. We are the instrument. Personally, I fear I may crash soon. Why did I get to that point?

Why not take care of me? Why not take care of YOU?

L.Lindsay archives

Am I doing this? Are YOU?

It became clear for me in Guatemala that they answer was no. I cannot be a receptacle to creativity if I don’t feel cared for. I cannot be imaginative and forth-giving if I don’t feel emotionally and physically safe, supported, and nurtured. A creative who feels drained cannot produce.

Deep work must begin.

My plan is to commit to:

Daily walks.

Nature always grounds me. I’ve gotten away from this practice because, quite frankly, the gym opened back up. I was no longer ‘forced’ to exercise outside. The gym was warmer. No icy patches to slip on. Now that it’s spring, the weather is better. Immersing myself in the tiny intricacies of nature will do me wonders. Tip: alone. No friends. Maybe no podcasts. The sounds of nature, children at play, my own thoughts. Perhaps music.

A Creative Check-In.

I’m not sure how I’ll do this. Reiki? Journaling? Meditation. Yoga? I already do two of these things regularly. Can you guess which I need to work on? Maybe this means I zone-out, ask myself: ‘what are you doing to fuel your creativity?’

Eliminating Toxic People.

Let’s face it: some people are not for you. You are not for everyone. There’s no rule that says you must force any relationship. If it doesn’t feel right, step away.

Spending Time with Those who Nurture & Support.

It doesn’t have to be that you are adored and your ego stroked all the time. But a creative individual requires her ideas to be heard, supported, coaxed, challenged in a way that brings insight and a spark. Find the sparks–the motivators–in your life. Here’s a group of some of my sparks.

Yoga friends in Guatemala

Other, self-explanatory things.

Eat right and regularly. Fruits and vegetables, plenty of water. Graze. When the blood sugar is off (from lack of water, sleep, or food), we get wonky, cranky. Who can generate creative things then? Move thy body. It could be daily walks, yoga, or more intense cardio; I always feel better with movement. Sleep more. Be mindful about how much time is spent on social media/looking at screens (it wears me down, makes my eyes tired). Rest when tired. This doesn’t mean sleep. It might mean staring out the window at the trees or listening to instrumental music. It might mean reading for pleasure.

The Bottom Line:

As we awake from our winter slumber, we’re reminded of the aches and pains, those things we haven’t tended to for awhile. Are you honoring the instrument that is YOUR creative force?

You can’t be everything to everyone everyday.

Rest. Read. Nap. Write. Spend Time in Nature. Surround Yourself with Nurturing Souls.

Let me know what you’re committing to! Respond here in a comment, or find me on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook.

xoxoxo

~Leslie : )

After nearly a decade of bringing great authors and their books right here, every Wednesday, I am shifting my focus a bit.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Want something from the archives? Just go to the search/magnifying glass on this website and type in the author or title you’re interested in, I might have it!

Here’s a glimpse of what you might have missed on Instagram:

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too. Tweet

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Dom J on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Recently Published:

Coming soon:

A conversation with Kim Adrian, author of TWENTY-SEVENTH LETTER OF THE ALPHABET to appear in The Florida Review. This one is unique from a structure and theme perspective.

Also! An interview with Marie Myung-Ok Lee in The Millions about her novel, THE EVENING HERO, available in May from Simon & Schuster.

Later: In Conversation with Maud Newton, author of the highly-anticipated ANCESTOR TROUBLE, to appear in Hippocampus Magazine, likely in May.

And…a conversation with Jokha Alaharthi, author of BITTER ORANGE TREE: A Novel in Adroit Journal.

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction in this space as well.

There’s more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling.

Did you know I dabble in photography?

Several pieces have been published in journals and some recently published in Invisible City, the MFA magazine of San Francisco and also Memoir Magazine.

I was recently accepted to the Kenyon Review Summer Writer’s Workshop and will be working on CNF with Terese Marie Mailhot, which will be a thrill and honor.

Image source: https://kenyonreview.org/writers/. Doesn’t this look dreamy?

I’m also busy visiting local bookstores, checking out cool towns, architecture, snapping photos, and you know…all kinds of goodness that brings me joy.

What I’m reading:

DON’T WORRY: 48 Lessons on Relieving Stress & Anxiety by Zen Buddhist monk Shunmyo Masuno.

Photo by Leslie Lindsay

What I’m listening to:

My inner voice and intuition. You know how sometimes the universe just ‘calls’ you? Well, that’s happening. Sometimes the world brings you things–you’re destined for and there’s something like that right now in my life. Also, in yoga, there’s a mudra about focus, patience, self-confidence, and intuition. It’s about mindfulness. I’m trying to keep all of that at the forefront.

L.Lindsay archives.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com

Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more HERE.

Generative Writing Practice: Old photographs, retreats, books, listening to one’s intuition, an interview with Mary Laura Philpott, and so much more

By Leslie Lindsay

Photo credit: L.Lindsay Join me on Instagram @leslielindsay #booknerd #alwayswithabook

After reading Mary Laura Philpott’s forthcoming, highly-anticipated memoir-in-essays, BOMB SHELTER (April 12, Atria Books), I knew I had to talk with her. Seriously, this woman is funny. She ‘gets’ it. She’s a writer and mother of teenagers/college-aged kids and we share some similar Southern-isms, like ‘oh my word,’ and ‘bless your heart,’ and ‘what in Sam Hill is this?’ But she’s thoughtful and deep and there’s a great conversation about structure, turtles, doing hard things.

Come eavesdrop on our conversation HERE.

Some exciting news:

I’ll be on writing retreat/workshop mode next week…in Guatemala! This is exciting because it combines several of my favorite things: writing, travel, gorgeous places, and a gathering of like-minded individuals. I’ll miss my family (and routine) terribly, but I this will be the creative re-set I crave.

I just took a fabulous online flash workshop with the lovely and talented Kathy Fish. The Art of Flash catapulted many ideas and pieces. If this is a genre that interests, I encourage you to check it out.

Photo by Dom J on Pexels.com

After nearly a decade of bringing great authors and their books right here, every Wednesday, I am shifting my focus a bit.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram in 2022, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Here’s a glimpse of what you might have missed on Instagram:

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too. Tweet

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Dom J on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Photo courtesy of L.Lindsay family archives

New Project:

I’m working on a new book/project and just completed a 50-page proposal, which is a huge accomplishment in and of itself. It has something to do with this photo. I’m innately interested in exploring ancestral stories and how they connect to the present generation, along with intergenerational trauma, resilience, and more.

Writing Prompt:

I don’t know who these children are. But they spoke to me from the confines of this 1920s frame at an antique store in Northfield, Minnesota. There are so many stories that are calling me here. The longevity (and ethics) of photography, the old house we used to live in…were these children even from this town or did they just ‘appear’ in the corners of the store by a dealer? Are they siblings or cousins? Each question generates about 100 stories. What does it do for you?

Image source: L.Lindsay archives

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Here are a couple to whet your appetite:

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction in this space as well.

There’s more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling.

ICYMI: This piece was published recently in Flash Frog Literary. It’s from the new project.

I have more flash coming from The Tiny Journal in May and an essay about my memoir-on-submission in Levitate Literary Journal, so keep an eye out for those pieces.

Also–did you know I dabble in photography? Several pieces have been published in journals and more forthcoming from Invisible City, the MFA magazine of San Francisco and also Memoir Magazine.

I was recently accepted to the Kenyon Review Summer Writer’s Workshop and will be working on CNF with Terese Marie Mailhot, which will be a thrill and honor.

Image source: https://kenyonreview.org/writers/. Doesn’t this look dreamy?

I’m also busy visiting local bookstores, checking out cool towns, architecture, snapping photos, and you know…all kinds of goodness that brings me joy.

What I’m reading:

Joyce Maynard’s AT HOME IN THE WORLD, about so many things: her relationship with her mother, father, sister, writing, home, her marriage, but also: a love affair with J.D. Salinger. It’s clear-eyed and beautifully written.

Photo by Marcus Aurelius on Pexels.com

What I’m listening to:

My inner voice and intuition. You know how sometimes the universe just ‘calls’ you? Well, that’s happening. Sometimes the world brings you things–you’re destined for and there’s something like that right now in my life. Also, in yoga, there’s a mudra about focus, patience, self-confidence, and intuition. It’s about mindfulness. I’m trying to keep all of that at the forefront.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Polina Kovaleva on Pexels.com

Don’t be a stranger! Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more about me HERE.

Is art generative? What about the persistence we must put in to make it all come together? I speak with Siri Hustvedt about this, plus other happenings: new work, interviews, bookstore visits, more

By Leslie Lindsay

I was so impressed and in awe this wise and moving book, MOTHERS, FATHERS, & OTHERS (Simon & Schuster, December 2021), that I reached out to the brilliant and generous Siri Hustvedt about an interview. To my delight, she agreed and we chatted about all things art and writing, and cover art, persistence, and so much more. It was a really lovely conversation.

Come on over, and join us.

This interview originally appeared in The Rumpus February 21, 2022.

It was even featured on Publisher’s Lunch February 23 and 24!

After nearly a decade of bringing great authors and their books right here, every Wednesday, I am shifting my focus a bit.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram in 2022, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Here’s a glimpse of what you might have missed on Instagram:

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too.Tweet

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Caryn on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Photo courtesy of L.Lindsay family archives

New Project:

I’m working on a new book/project and just completed a 50-page proposal, which is a huge accomplishment in and of itself. It has something to do with this photo. I’m innately interested in exploring ancestral stories and how they connect to the present generation, along with intergenerational trauma, resilience, and more.

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Here are a couple to whet your appetite:

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction on this space as well.

ICYMI: This piece was published recently in Flash Frog Literary. It’s from the new project.

Also! I was recently accepted to the Kenyon Review Summer Writer’s Workshop and will be working on CNF with Terese Marie Mailhot, which will be a thrill and honor.

Image source: https://kenyonreview.org/writers/. Doesn’t this look dreamy?

I’m also busy visiting local bookstores, checking out cool towns, architecture, snapping photos, and you know…all kinds of goodness that brings me joy.

What I’m reading:

The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet by Kim Adrian (University of Nebraska Press, 2018) and it’s soo good. Told in a micro-style ‘glossary’ this is a uniquely structured memoir that reads beautifully. Clear, concise distillations of a mother’s devolve into psychosis, her struggles with mental health.

Image source: L.Lindsay @leslielindsay1 #alwayswithabook #booknerd

What I’m listening to:

David Naimon in conversation with Lacy Johnson via Between the Covers podcast: about her 2018 book The Reckonings, now in paperback. If you’re not already listening to Between the Covers, you must start. I promise, it will make you smarter and a deeper thinker.

Photo cred: https://tinhouse.com/podcast/lacy-m-johnson-the-reckonings/

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

Photo by Polina Kovaleva on Pexels.com

Don’t be a stranger! Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more about me HERE.

Can Trauma be inherited? What’s it like to be on the therapy couch, a fly-on-the-wall? Leslie Lindsay and Dr. Galit Atlas in Conversation about EMOTIONAL INHERITANCE

By Leslie Lindsay

I was so swept away with this wise and moving book, EMOTIONAL INHERITANCE: A Therapist, her Patients, and the Legacy of Trauma (Little, Brown Spark, January 2022).

Come on over, eavesdrop on our conversation.

This interview originally appeared in Hippocampus Magazine February 2022.

After nearly a decade of bringing great authors and their books right here, every Wednesday, I am shifting my focus a bit.

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram in 2022, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too.Tweet

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Photo by Nugroho Wahyu on Pexels.com

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Here are a couple to whet your appetite:

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction on this space as well.

New Project:

I’m hard at work on the next book. It’s about ancestors and generations, how we’re all connected through land and home. I’m also applying to residencies, conferences, taking workshops, and classes.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

reestocks.org on Pexels.com

Don’t be a stranger! Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more about me HERE.

Fiction Friday: NICKELS ON EYES by Leslie Lindsay

By Leslie Lindsay

I’m honored to share this piece with you, which was inspired by my (late) grandmother’s memory of seeing her baby brother laid out on the dining room table with nickels on his eyes. It’s a harrowing memory, but one that made a searing impression on my then-five-year-old grandmother.

This piece was featured on Flash Frog Literary February 7th, 2022.

Original art by Luis G. Romero

Read Nickels on Eyes HERE.

Oscar sleeps on the porch, on an old sofa. He will eat the stuffing, if he gets hungry enough, he says.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram in 2022, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too.Tweet

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Valerio Errani on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Here are a couple to whet your appetite:

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction on this space as well.

New Project:

I’m hard at work on the next book. It’s about ancestors and generations, how we’re all connected through land and home. I’m also applying to residencies, conferences, taking workshops, and classes.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

reestocks.org on Pexels.com

Don’t be a stranger! Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more about me HERE.

Where Have all The Interviews Gone?

By Leslie Lindsay

I’m still here, just in a slightly different format…

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

After nearly a decade of bringing great authors and their books right here, every Wednesday, I am shifting my focus a bit.

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you.

You can find all of my bookish suggestions, reviews, and more on Instagram in 2022, where I’ll be sharing reels and blurbs about books, what I’m reading, and even writing.

Psst! You can share this on Twitter, too.

Keep scrolling to learn more:

Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

Memoir-on-Submission:

MODEL HOME: Motherhood, Madness & Memory is ‘making the rounds’ with publishing houses. This book has been in my heart for years. It’s about my mother’s devolve into psychosis when I was 10; the body, mind, houses and homes (she was an interior decorator), our estrangement, breaking the cycle, her suicide, my complex grief.

It’s time for this story to make its way into the world.

Learn more about MODEL HOME in this Psychology Today Q&A with Caroline Leavitt.

~Represented by Catalyst Literary Management~

Photo by Jonathan Meyer on Pexels.com

Author Interviews:

I’m grateful for this essay with Read Her Like an Open Book, which goes into some detail about the authors I’ve hosted over the years as well as my writerly journey. You might like this post I shared in December 2021 about an end-of-an-era

Occasionally, I’ll have an author interview published in a literary journal. I’ll be sure to share that with you, too.

Here are a couple to whet your appetite:

  • Coming soon: Siri Hustvedt chats with me about her newest book, MOTHERS, FATHERS & OTHERS: Essays (December 2021, Simon & Schuster) in The Rumpus.

I’ll be sharing my published interviews here, on Wednesdays, after they’ve ‘gone live’ with their various publications. On Fridays, I’ll share any recent published fiction on this space as well.

New Project:

I’m hard at work on the next book. It’s about ancestors and generations, how we’re all connected through land and home. I’m also applying to residencies, conferences, taking workshops, and classes.

In the meantime, catch me on:

Reviewing books and talking about them with others on-line and in-person is one small way to engage with & support the literary community.

It’s been a joy and privilege to connect with authors and share interviews with you. Thank you for letting me guide you on your bookish journey.

reestocks.org on Pexels.com

Don’t be a stranger! Let’s walk this bookish path together.

Find me on Instagram, and Twitter. See what I’m reading on Bookshop.org. Find my reviews on GoodReads. I’m also a Zibby Books Ambassador.

Learn more about me HERE.