All posts tagged: ADHD

Lisa Selin Davis talks about her new book, TOMBOY, what it means to defy borders and boundaries, how parents may have participated in the blue/pink divide and so much more in this insightful and daring new book

By Leslie Lindsay  A thorough and engrossing sociological, historical, and psychological examination and the antiquated term ‘tomboy,’ an imagined future for children who defy categories, and so much more. ~BookS on MondaY|Always with a Book~ TOMBOY: The Surprising History and Future of Girls Who Dare to Be Different (Hachette Books, August 11 2020) first came to my attention this past spring and I knew I had read it. As a ‘soccer mom,’ I often hear this on the pitch, “Oh, she’s just a Tomboy” or something of similar ilk. I started thinking about why we use this term and if there really was such a thing. And then I read Lisa Selin Davis’s insightful and daring new book and felt we were cut from the same cloth. Here’s thing: I don’t really think ‘Tomboys’ exist. People do. And we need to stop with the labels and marketing that supports (or doesn’t support) this divide. Davis takes us deep into the history of the term ‘tomboy’ and provides stunning examples of how advertising and marketing have played to the stereotypes of gender, gender …

In My Brain Today: Handing out Natural Consequences

By Leslie Lindsay About a week ago, I posted a comment on Facebook which seemed a tad bit controversial.  It was about my views on natural/logical consequences and went something like this:   “Yesterday, my daughter refused to clean her room.   Instead, she shoved paper and Kleenex in her nightstand drawer.  She had piles–I mean piles–of projects, toys, stuffed animals, etc on her floor, resulting in a fall hazard.  She’d heard our threats–that if she continues to treat her bedroom as a trashcan, we’d take away her trashcan.  We took the trashcan away.  Last night, the same daughter refused to eat dinner neatly after several reminders and spilled her dinner all over herself.  She hated the feeling of warm food on her sweater and jeans.  I shrugged and said, “Well, take it off and put it in the laundry room and then come back to the table to finish your meal.”   We didn’t yell, we didn’t scream.  She did. As parents, we were employing the idea of “natural consequences.”  It sounds like tough love and maybe it is.  But I will tell you, it’s …