All posts tagged: amazon

Apraxia Monday: A Gossip Columnist Shares “Speaking of Apraxia”

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://socialtimes.com/another-online-newspaper-ventures-into-socal-shopping_b43352) Talk of the Town: Gossip Queen & Child Development Expert Answers your Most Pressing Questions. Today’s Topic: Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) Saturday, September 24, 2012 Dear Miss Talks-a-Lot:  Argh!  I am so frustrated.  My 3 year old son has so much difficulty talking.  It’s like he knows what he wants to say, but he can’t quite get the words out. Everything else [developmentally] seems to be right on target, yet he just jibbers and gestures.  What could be going on?  –Frustrated in Colorado(image source: http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/wyoming/rocky-mountains) The Rocky Mountains plus the rugged beauty of Wyoming add up to Dear Frustrated in Colorado: It sounds like your son may be suffering from Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS), this neurologically based motor speech disorder is characterized by the inability to connect thoughts with verbal output.  It’s as though the child knows what he wants to say, he just cannot coordinate the muscles of articulation with his brain. Often, kids with CAS will gesture or create their own words and phrases to …

Write on, Wednesday: Naming Your Characters

By Leslie Lindsay A topic we love to discuss around my house is that of names.  It started even before we had children.  What names mean, what their connotations are, family names, you (ha) name it–we talked about it.  So, one would think that when it came time for me to write novels, the names would just pour out of me as if I were a walking-talking Beyond Jennifer and Jason.  Alas, it does not.  (image source, Amazon.com 9.19.12) How difficult can it be to name your character?  Pick a name you like of the right gender and move on, right?  Not so fast.  When selecting the name of a charcter you have spent time, effort, and and hours crafting one must really be diligent on how they come about the name of a much-loved (or hated) character.  I have a character I working with right now.  I call him Steve.  Where did this name come from?  Have I ever known any real-life Steves?  Well, kind of.  There was a boy who lived in my …

Apraxia Monday: “Speaking of Apraxia” Excerpt Chapter 7

By Leslie Lindsay Here we are–back again to Monday (sigh).  Funny how that linear time thing works, huh?  I thought we’d plow right ahead where we left off before the launch of the book with another excerpt, this one is of Chapter 7:  All About Speech Therapy–Methods best suited to kids with apraxia. (From Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech, March 2012 Woodbine House).  Therapy Strategies Before we get into the nitty-gritty details of therapy strategies for CAS in particular, it’s good to know that there are two main types of approaches to speech therapy in general: 1)    The Bottom-up Approach. The SLP introduces easy to hard (simple to more complex) sounds/words such as vowels (V), as in “oh;” consonant-vowel (CV), as in “me;” vowel-consonant (VC), as in “up;” and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC), as in “mom.” 2)   The Hierarchical Approach. The SLP starts where the child is presently performing; that is, she starts with what the child can say already. Here, you will find various therapy strategies with a brief definition: Therapy …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 2–Speech 101

By Leslie Lindsay Even if your child doesn’t have apraxia (CAS), there may be some things you have always wondered about–at least as far as speech acquisition goes.  Well, you are in luck–here’s an excerpt of chapter 2 from “Speaking of Apraxia: Speech 101.”  “Imagine if you will, a little boy who has a dream, a dream to communicate. He wishes he could answer your question so that you understand his response. He wishes she could ask for clarification when he doesn’t know exactly what you want him to say or do. He wishes to connect with his friends in their verbal play, or to raise his hand in eagerness to answer his teacher. Because in his mind, he knows what he wants to say, yet he just can’t get it out. Imagine this little boy is yours.”  Communication is part of our everyday life. It’s in the news, the radio, on television. It’s on the road, in the grocery store, at school, at work. It’s everywhere. When you exchange a few words with your …