All posts tagged: children’s books

The Teacher is Talking: Saying Bye Bye to Binky

By Leslie Lindsay ***Be sure to see the end of this post for details to WIN a FREE copy of Perry Passyflyer!!*** I am happy to share with you three very fun and proactive mommas who have penned a book about the ever-lasting–or is it–pacifier, in the May 2012 release Perry Passyflyer from AuthorsHouse. You know it is a Nuk, a binky, a passy…but whatever the case, it’s probably been a staple around your home, especially if you have kids (and if you don’t, well…I don’t know what to tell ya)! If your kids who have fallen in love with their pacifer, you know the relationship can’t last forever. At one time or another, we all need to say “bye-bye, binky.” Yet there are varied ways to go about this. Here’s the take from co-authors, Katie, Liddy, and Danielle: L4K: Let’s start with introductions. Can you give us a brief run-down of who you are–your backgrounds, your families and your “day job?” Katie: My day job is a delightful combination of being a stay-at-home mom …

The Teacher is on Vacation: Cross-Cultural Book List

By Leslie Lindsay The teacher may be on summer vacation, but that doesn’t mean you–or your kiddo(s)–have to stop learning, right?!  Exactly.  I was hoping you’d feel that way. But don’t worry, it doesn’t have to be all gloom and doom.  Summer is a great time to get some reading in–for parents and kids alike.  You can go the typical route and read all of the Caldecott Medal Winners or your child’s summer book list, or you go with the International Reading Association (IRA)’s suggested list of Notable Books for a Global Society [Awards].  Wow…this is a category I am not familiar with.  Thought you’d appreciate the heads-up, too.  You can access the list, dating back to the late 1990’s at http://www.clrsig.org/nbgs.php Here are a few to get you started… PICTURE BOOKS:  Minji’s Salon by Eun-lee Choung (Kane/Miller Press, 2008) Chavela and the Magic Bubble by Monica Brown (Clarion Press, 2010) The Forever Forest: Kids Save a Tropical Forest by Joy Pratt-Serafini (Dawn Publications, 2008) (image retrieved from Amazon, 6.25.12) INTERMEDIATE TITLES:  Hachiko:  The True …

The Teacher is Talking: The Longest Day

By Leslie Lindsay (image retrieved 6.5.12 from Amazon.com) I came across this book, The Longest Day: Celebrating the Summer Solstice by Wendy Pfeffer, illustrated by Linda Bleck.  I presented it to my daughters about two years ago as the longest day of the year rolled around.  At the time, they were probably a bit too young to really understand and appreciate the book, but today–at 5 and 7 years old–they curled up next to me as I read from the colorful pages. And now that most kids are out of school for the summer, it may just be a good time to introduce the reason why we have summer in the first place.  And that is just what the “teacher” will be talking about here on Practical Parenting…with a Twist for the next couple of weeks. The official first day of summer this year is Wednesday, June 20th.  That is, the northern half of the earth tilts toward the sun and so it gets more sunshine than the southern half (that’s why it’s summer in …

A Little Literacy, Please: Alice Wonders about Science & Fiction

By Leslie Lindsay You have probably heard of her, too.  Alison Gopnik, a world-renown developmental psychologist who studied at the University of Oxford and now teaches at the University of California-Berkeley has penned such parenting books as The Scientist in the Crib (Harper, 2000) and The Philosophical Baby: What Children’s Minds Tell Us About Truth, Love, and the Meaning of Life (Picador, 2010)   What you might not know is her favorite childhood books were Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll.  As an empirical developmental psychologist, it was no wonder  (ha) that Ms. Gopnik identified with Alice’s character.  “I was Alice”  I shared her name, long hair, and dreamy absentmindedness.  I had a preference for logic and imagination over common sense.  I too, was bewildered by the blindness of grown-ups, esxpecially their failure to recognize that children were smarter than they were.”  Alison Gopnik continues to explain in All I Ever Needed to Know I Learned from a Children’s Book (Roaring Book Press, 2009) that Alice in Wonderland is the link between logic …

A Little Literacy, Please: Mary Poppins

By Leslie Lindsay When my daughters came back from an outing to the Fox Theatre in St. Louis, Missouri raving about “Mary Poppins,” several summers ago, I scratched my head and raised my eyebrows.  Mary Poppins, really?!  Isn’t she kind of…well, old-fashioned? But they loved her mysterious magic and fun.  They were mesmerized by her wit and charm.  I had to run out and purchase the movie for they wouldn’t stop talking about her.  My oldest even wanted to be her for Halloween that year.  I convinced her, sweetly, diplomatically that maybe she better be something else.  And so she was Strawberry Shortcake. We definitely went through a Mary Poppins phase and I guess it wasn’t all bad.  There were some good, wholesome lessons from the sassy nanny. Anita Diamont, a journalist and New York Times best-selling novelist mentioned that this was one of her favorite childhood books in Everything I Know I Learned from a Children’s Book, (Roaring Book Press, 2009). She says, “Mary Poppins herself was the best magic of all: a free-spirit who comes and goes …

A Little Literacy, Please: Goodnight Moon

By Leslie Lindsay Seems every parent receives a copy of Margaret Wise Brown’s Goodnight Moon, at some point in their parenting journey.  We did.  Wrapped in brown paper packaging was a small board book version of the classic, along with a hand-sewen pillow emblazoned with a moon and stars, “Dear Baby Kate,” the note read.  It was from extended family on my husband’s side of the family. We still have the book.  Even though it’s a board book, the last page is torn and repaired by Dr. Mom.  My daughter’s still request it be read on occassion and they always ask about the torn pages.  “Baby Kate did it,” my youngest likes to announce.   She’s right. We’ve read the book the traditional way–straight through.  We’ve read the book with normal volume of voice at the beginning, getting quieter and quieter until we are whispering at the end.  And we’ve even adapted the book as the girls got older to a more “crude” way of reading, “And the old lady said shut up and go to bed already!”  At …

A Little Literacy, Please: Everything I need to know I learned from Children’s Book

By Leslie Lindsay I was at the library one day last week when I spied this book propped up on one of the end-caps near the children’s section:  “Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Children’s Book: Life Lessons from Notable People from all Walks of Life” and smiled.  It’s catchy title (a spin-off from Robert Fulghum’s, “Everything I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten”) and a fun premise, lead me to snatch if off the shelf and stuff it into my library bag. I flippped through the book once we got home as the girls will happily lolling about with their library books.  Katherine Paterson, Anne Tyler, Robert Ebert, Steve Forbes, Andrew Wyeth, (and a handful of folks I admittedly don’t know a thing about) all contributed their favorite childhood books–many classics–and why those titles shaped their world vision. So…I think this will book will become the basis of Tuesday’s “A Little Literacy, Please”—at least for a few weeks.  In the meantime, let me know of your favorite childhood books and perhaps they can be …