All posts tagged: critique partner

Write On, Wednesday Thursday: What you can learn by reading a bad book

  My critique partner and I love to, well…critique. It’s part of the job. Occupational hazard. We critique our own work, we critique each other’s. We gripe about good authors who write bad books and bad authors who write good books.  We compare ourselves to other debut authors–what have they got that we don’t?  What made an agent sign them, but not us?  We love to find fault with characters and plot, and dumb sentences. We aren’t perfect. Therefore, we can’t possibly write a perfect book. No one can. In this business, we find that there’s a buzzword: subjective. What I like, she may not. What she likes, I am may find garbage. And then there’s the whole literary agent rejection letter, “We wish you all the best, and please keep in mind that this is just one opinion and another agent my feel differently.” [hint: subjective]. So, what can be gained by reading a so-called ‘bad’ book? A lot. For one, we learn what we don’t like. Be it too many f-bombs, or too …

Write On, Wednesday: Pantser versus Plotter

By Leslie Lindsay I thought I would share a little insight from my daughter’s second grade classroom this past spring.  Since it’s about the components of fiction writing, I thought it would work.  And it probably still will.  But I am not in the mood for it today.  That’s what makes me a panster.  If you’re unfamiliar with the term, let me enlighten you.  A pantser is a person who flies by the seat of their pants when writing.  There is no piddly outline to follow, no hidden agenda.  The pantser loves to write.  Well, the plotter probably does, too I can’t really speak to that being that I am not a plotter.  Like.  At.  All.  The mere mention of an outline scares the heebie-jeebies outta me.  Here’s the reason:  I hated them in school. They stifle my creativity, my flow, and were just pointless.  (Could it be the same reason I turn into a cold sweat when I hear the word budget?) But is there a right way or a wrong way to be a writer?  No. It …