All posts tagged: Eugenics

Sylvia True talks about her astonishing novel-based-on-a-true story, WHERE MADNESS LIES, combining elements of historical fiction, medicine, mental illness, motherhood, secrets, more

By Leslie Lindsay Such a beautifully tragic and heart-wrenching tale of hope and redemption, a lesser-known slice of WWII, combining intergenerational trauma, mental illness, secrets, more. ~WRITERS INTERVIEWING WRITERS|ALWAYS WITH A BOOK~ Spotlight: Women’s Historical Fiction I was absolutely struck by the themes and ideas—and writing—in WHERE MADNESS LIES (Top Hat Books, February 1 2021) by Sylvia True, which is a gorgeous and devastating voyage into the madness of madness, tracing the Nazis’ view of the morally disgusting idea of racial hygiene, but also eradicating ‘any life not worth living,’ such as those deemed feebleminded, mentally ill, sexually degenerate, more. Alternating between the 1980s Massachusetts, and 1930s Germany, with a brief stint in Switzerland, WHERE MADNESS LIES is so beautifully rendered. I was in awe at the breadth of this book–in terms of historical accuracy, emotional intelligence, compelling voice/characters, how it’s based on a true story, and so much more. This story is hauntingly compelling, devastating, and horrifying, yet there’s a glimmer of hope dangling from a pearl. WHERE MADNESS LIES is achingly honest and masterful, a page-turner with fully developed characters and timelines, each …

Mother Nature: George Eliot was a woman

By Leslie Lindsay  (image retrieved May 19, 2012 from Amazon) I am still plowing through this large book, Mother Nature:  A History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection, by Sarah Blaffer Hrdy as an effort to learn a bit more about the female psyche, how it was viewed in the past, and how we as women can continue to be progressive.  I know we have come a long way, but isn’t there always room for growth? I would like to introduce you to two “characters” from the Victorian time period: 1) The English novelist, George Eliot who was really a woman.  Yes, indeed, Mary Ann Evans wrote as George Eliot, back in the mid-late 1800’s when only respectable writers could be a man.  Gasp! 2) Social philosopher, Herbert Spencer (a contemporary of Charles Darwin, and widely read).  To Spencer, the surivival of the fittest meant “survival of the best and most deserving.”   His simple message was: the advantages you enjoy are deserved.  For Spencer, evolution meant “progress.”   Yet, the problem with Spencer’s reasoning was that the environment never changes; …