All posts tagged: excerpts from Speaking of Apraxia

APRAXIA MONDAY series 1/4: does my child have apraxia of speech (CAS)? plus, leslie lindsay reads from speaking of apraxia, hints & Tips for selecting an SLP, more

By Leslie Lindsay  Author of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA reads from the first few pages of of the book, discusses how to find a speech-language pathologist (SLP).  ~APRAXA MONDAY|ALWAYS WITH A BOOK~ Spotlight: Does my child have apraxia of speech (CAS) 1/4?  Years ago, as a new mom, I was so, so eager to hear those first, tender words from my first child. When they didn’t come, I worried. But then I thought, “kids develop at different rates, it’s no big deal.” When others–my mom-friends, the neighbors, the pediatrician–raised an eyebrow, I was even more worried. After all, Kate could hear and seemed to understand everything we said. So what was the problem?  Here, I read a bit from the first few pages of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2020), which might help put things in perspective.    #1 Amazon bestseller in communication disorders/special education “So impressed with this awesome work! Every chapter was SO easy to get through and jam-packed with gold nuggets for parents and caregivers!” Your next step, if you’re truly concerned about …

Apraxia Monday: ABCs & CAS (Why Reading is Hard, How YOU Can Help)

By Leslie Lindsay We know that having children with CAS presents a different set of challenges.  From not being able to commuicate clearly to learning to read, seems there is always something we need to help our little people with .  Learning to read with CAS is topic that is often up for discussion.  Why is it so darn hard for these kiddos to learn to read?  And what can you do to help your child?  Why Is Reading Difficult for Children with CAS?  Kids with apraxia have several problem areas to consider when reading comes into the picture: Kids who aren’t making sounds accurately (or at all) may have a decreased visual representation of what letters look and sound like.   Kids with speech-language disorders may have a distorted sense of what the symbols (letters) represent (letters are symbols which represent words).   Kids with apraxia may have “differently-wired” brains, affecting the way they read, learn, and interpret information.   Children affected with CAS may have a decreased ability to coordinate the vocal track …

Apraxia Monday: Tips for Teachers

By Leslie Lindsay Your children may already be back in school–or you may have week or two before the big day.  In any case, you’re likely thinking about it–specifics, plus the extras like how you’re going to talk to your child’s teacher about CAS (if you haven’t already).  But what if you are a teacher who has a child with apraxia in your classroom this year?  Here are a few tips and ideas from parents who may help you understand what all of the hoop-la is about.  (retrieved from CASANA, 8.30.12, a YouTube video]   See this short video on Apraxia.  It’s a worth your 3 minutes!   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nN9dG5F7M0 Tips for Teachers If you are a teacher reading this, then hooray! I applaud your efforts to learn more about the kiddos in your classroom. Read the child’s IEP. If parents challenge your knowledge, make special requests, or argue for a special IEP meeting, remind them that you are on their side and please don’t take it personally.As parents we just want the very best for our children and …

Apraxia Monday: Preparing Your Child for the First Day of School

By Leslie Lindsay Hard to believe that back-to-school is amongst us–how is it even possible that it’s already August 6th?!  Here are some more tips and ideas to help you and your child ease your way into the school scene.  Preparing Your Child for the First Day Where your child is concerned, start early, but not too early, in prepping him for school. Be sure to drive by the school ahead of time. Point it out and get excited about the place where your child will be learning and playing. Then, a week or so later, pack a picnic and head over for lunch and some time on the playground. Your child will remember that you were there with her, so when she is playing with classmates, it won’t seem so unfamiliar. Teach her how to ask others to join her in play (see bullet points below). The building may be big and potentially confusing.Either way, go to orientation and show your child around. Remind her that she will never be walking around the school …

Apraxia Monday: Improving Reading Skills

  By Leslie Lindsay  If you have a child with CAS (childhood apraxia of speech), then you are probably aware that verbal communication is a bit of a…well, challenge.  It may also come as no surprise that reading and writing may also be a challenge for your little one with CAS.  You will likely start to see this struggle as your kiddo hits the later preschool years (Pre-K) moving into kindergarten. Since it’s summertime, it may be a great time to practice these skills without the pressure to perform.  You and your child can progress at a rate that is comfortable to you….and come fall, your child with apraxia is ready to put those hard-learned skills into action. But let’s start with the basics: why is it so hard for kids with CAS to read and write?  Aside from pulling out some heavy-duty texts to explain all of this, I will just provide a couple of basics: 1.  Kids who aren’t making sounds accurately–or at all–may have a decreased visual of what letters look–and sound like. …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 5–Getting the CAS Diagnosis/Initial Reactions

By Leslie Lindsay (An excerpt from Speaking of Apraxia: A Paren’ts Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  Chapter 5: “Getting the Diagnosis and Coping with Your Initial Reactions”).    You may have been searching for years for some term to identify why your child isn’t talking like every other child. Perhaps you weren’t that concerned in the first place, but took your child to a speech-language pathologist because your friends, your mother, or a concerned neighbor or teacher urged you to. In either case, you now have a word to describe the phenomenon: Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). What’s next? Common Reactions If it took you awhile to arrive at a diagnosis, you may be feeling like your competence as a parent has been challenged.   “Gosh, I knew there was something wrong, why wouldn’t (or couldn’t) anyone tell me what it was?!”  You may feel some resentment toward any professionals you consulted who shooed you away, assuring you everything was “fine.” “I knew I was right! Those doctors were so incompetent. Their lack of competency …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 3 Excerpt

By Leslie Lindsay If you have been following along recently, you know that Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech will be released later this month.  It’s been a long–but overall good–journey in which I have been reading, writing, and revising to get this book into the hands of parents of children with CAS.  As a “count-down-to-release-day,” I am offering some excerpts of the book.  This one is on chapter 3:  Finding Help When You Suspect CAS.  Here goes: “As first-time parents, we didn’t want to appear “delinquent,” so when Kate was 15 months old, exactly, we headed to the doctor (the same one who delivered her) for her scheduled well-child check-up. I say “we,” because both doting parents were off work for the occasion. We came armed with our wiggly daughter; along with thoughts, questions, and toddler antics to relate to our doctor. Kate was meeting all of her developmental milestones right on target. Except one: talking. She had only one word, “Hi.” I was excited that she had such a …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 1

By Leslie Lindsay Welcome to the first installment of a series of excerpts of forthcoming, “Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech” (Woodbine House, March 2012).  Here we begin at the beginning: chapter one.  You may have some suspicions that your child isn’t talking like he or she should; maybe you’ve heard of apraxia (CAS), but you just aren’t sure if that is why your little punkin isn’t chatting like all of the other children. Consider these scenarios: “Sarah, age 2, was a puzzle to her parents. She was obviously quite bright and alert. She knew the names of all the birds in her Big Book of Birds and would point to the cardinal, chickadee, etc. when asked. But she struggled to say even the simplest words.” “Jake was an active three-year-old who loved cause and effect, an engineer in the making.  He appeared to be a typically-developing child, with one exception: he was not talking. His grandmother kept saying, “Boys are late to talk–don’t worry.” But his parents were concerned. …