All posts tagged: Jonah Lehrer

Write on, Wednesday: Imagine a Better Writer

By Leslie Lindsay (image retrieved from http://katacomb.blogspot.com/2012/05/revising-book-2.html on 7.25.12)    Last week on “The Teacher is Talking” (Tuesday), I shared with you the wonderful new book Imagine:  How Creativity Works (Jonah Lehrer, 2012).  Well, if you read this book like a writer, you may actually gain a few insights into your own creativity.  At least I did–specifically as I work through the tedious task of editing and revising my novel-in-progress.  And here’s why, as explained by the author: You need to become an outsider.  Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer (Mar 19, 2012) (image retrieved from Amazon.com on 7.25.12) But I wrote this!  This is part of me!”  you claim.  And if you remember the good Tennessee Williams, “if the writing is good, you cannot seperate it from the author.”  Yeah, I feel your pain.  Trust me, I do.  When one goes back to edit/revise he really needs to know nothing.  This is the whole idea of reading the work as though you know nothing about it.  This is what your agent/editor will do.  They …

The Teacher is Talking: Imagine How Creativity Works

By Leslie Lindsay  (image retrieved from Amazon.com on 7.17.12)  I have this new book and I am pretty much loving every minute I am reading.  At first glance, though I will admit that I wasn’t too keen on it.*  I know, cringe.  Who can’t love a book about creativity?  I am shaking my head right now.  Ooops, that may be a little piece of my creativity falling out… Here’s the thing: Jonah Lehrer does a fantastic job of taking all of this brain hullabaloo and making it readable.  Okay, sure there are some big words in there like dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior superior temporal gyrus.  But he breaks it all down into terms we can all understand (jeez, where was this book when I was in nursing school?!).  And he makes things seems practical, realistic, and attainable.  All qualities we can appreciate.  In just the first sitting with this book, I learned more about creativity–and harvesting it–than I have in well, maybe my whole life.  It’s not that the book is a “how-to” by …

Apraxia Monday: “Apraxia…You Just Gotta Practice!”

By Leslie Lindsay I wanted to share with you a personal moment–and one that I think will touch you, whether you have a child with CAS, or not.  [Portions of this post originally appeared as a guest blog on Say What Y’all, hosted by Haley Villines.  Thanks, Haley for allowing me to be a guest on your blog]. You won’t soon forget her.  The red hair and blue eyes the size of saucers will linger in your memory.  So, too will the fact that she is as fire-y and energetic as that copper hair that cascades down her back, framing her freckled face with possibility.  And when you hear her speak, you may have an inkling that she once suffered from moderate to severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), or you may be none the wiser. Although Kate is a bright, creative, and eager soon-to-be 2nd grader, she has overcome a road block most of us never have to deal with: a struggle to communicate expressively.  I won’t bore you with the early days of …