All posts tagged: Laird Hunt

Laird Hunt talks about how ZORRIE was inspired by his grandmother, her ties to Indiana, plus memory, being a literary citizen, the transformative, multifaceted aspects of the color green, more

By Leslie Lindsay  Gorgeously and sparsely told tale of one woman’s life from her hardscrabble days on an Indiana farm and everything in-between. ~Writers Interiewing Writers|Always with a Book~ March Spotlight: Historical Fiction O Magazine’s Most Anticipated Historical Fiction Novels of 2021   This stunning and luminously told story is so affecting, and transformative, too. Set against the harsh, quintessential Midwestern landscape, ZORRIE (Bloomsbury, Feb 9, 2021) is at once a historical fiction of a one woman’s life, but also a study in Americana, grit, and the transformative events of the 20th century. Zorrie is an orphaned child who goes to live with her aunt on a farm in Indiana. She’s twenty-one when she decides to set off on her own, and it just so happens to be in the midst of the Great Depression. She ends up in Illinois working odd jobs and then at the radium plant, sleeping in abandoned barns and under the stars. At the end of the day, the girls from the factory glowed from the radioactive material. Here she meets several young women who become friends–those …

A fairy tale? A hero’s journey? Something else? Laird Hunt talks about the motifs in his new book, abandoned homes, witches & so much more

By Leslie Lindsay  Luminous tale of a grim journey about one woman in Colonial America whom is oozing evil but doesn’t realize it–a modern-day fairy tale in Laird Hunt’s new novel, IN THE HOUSE IN THE DARK OF THE WOODS.  It’s that time of year when we cast our gazes to the eerie and dreadful. So when this little book (don’t let the size fool you), came to my attention I knew I had to read it. IN THE HOUSE IN THE DARK OF THE WOODS (Little, Brown October 16, 2018) is a contemporary rendering of a historical literary horror; it reads like a classic but was written in 2018. Hunt takes readers on a harrowing journey to Colonial America where one woman goes missing…or does she leave her homestead? Perhaps she has been *asked* to leave or maybe kidnapped? It’s never really stated one way or another and multiple interpretations can be shed. Alone, barefoot, and possibly lost, the woman meets another woman at a little stone house in the woods and all changes. IN THE …