All posts tagged: literary agents

Miciah Bay Gault talks about her luminous literary thriller, GOODNIGHT STRANGER, how she wasn’t trying to write a thriller, finding an agent, reincarnation, plus a fabulous reading list

By Leslie Lindsay  Deeply compelling and highly disturbing at times, GOODNIGHT STRANGER is a suspenseful literary thriller with themes of grief, love, and human behavior.  This is one of those books that is as eerie as moving, for me, and also has a bit of magical realism/suspended belief that may excite and intrigue. As a debut, GOODNIGHT STRANGER (Park Row Books, July 30) is darn good. Lydia and her brother, Lucas live in their family’s ramshackle home on fictional Wolf Island (just off Cape Cod) and while they are adults, they haven’t exactly ‘launched.’ Lydia is 28 years old when the story begins and she’s a college dropout with dreams of going back. She left Brown when her mother became ill. Her brother is a bit ‘different’ in the way he sees the world. Pathologically shy, Lucas spends his time doing odd jobs and living in the home shadowed by past events. And ghosts. Lucas and Lydia are the two remaining children of triplets. The other child, who is referred to as ‘Baby B,’ died tragically as an …

Debut author Martine Fournier-Watson talks about how our lives are magical, how it comes from within, her hopes and worries; how to query agents and so much more in THE DREAM PEDDLER

By Leslie Lindsay  Gorgeously and lyrically told debut from Martine Fournier Watson about desires and hopes, grief and love set against the backdrop of a small town in the early 1900s. How could I *not* pick up a book entitled, THE DREAM PEDDLER (Penguin, April 2019)? I love small towns and dreams…so this was exactly my kind of read. The premise here is that a traveling salesman comes to town with the promise of being able whip up a potion for you to have a very delightful dream, money back guarantee if you don’t. So would you purchase a dream potion? Maybe you’d like the chance to reconnect with a lost loved one, have some superpower, a passionate fantasy, or some other personal triumph. Robert Owens comes into a small farming town pulling a buggy of potions behind him on the very day a young boy, Ben, goes missing. Parents and townspeople search for the boy and Robert quietly sets up shop. Before long, townsfolk begin seeking out Mr. Owens to request a dream for …

Write On, Wednesday: Interview with Simone St. James–Ghosts, Books, Agents, & More

By Leslie Lindsay I am super-excited to share a new-to-me author, award-winning Simone St. James. She writes gothic ghost stories that will make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end. Toss in a little love and a great setting—the lost era of the 1920s—and you’re in for a very compelling read. Leslie Lindsay: Simone, thanks so very much for being with us today. I must admit to just now reading your 2012 debut, THE HAUNTING OF MADDY CLARE and I love it! It’s dark, it’s gritty, and it definitely makes me think. But not just anyone can pull off a ghost story without it appearing contrived. What kind of research did you do to fully understand ghosts and ghost hunting in the 1920s? Simone St. James: Hi Leslie, thanks for having me! The idea for MADDY CLARE wasn’t based on any specific historical fact. People were as fascinated by ghosts in the 1920’s as they are today. There were psychical research societies, though they were considered eccentric and not taken seriously. …

Fiction Friday Meets Write On,Wednesday

By Leslie Lindsay If you’ve been toiling away on a manuscript and getting no where with agents, then what are you doing wrong? I know, I know…I ask this at least once a day. Bet you do, too. The thing is this: so many writers are too concerned with the end result [a published book] than they are with the act of writing. Sure, we all want to ‘have written,’ but it’s the ‘writing’ that gets us there. In the meantime, do your very best writing each and every day. Sure, it takes dogged determination and a thick skin, but it’s what gets you from point A to point B. [Hint: Butt in chair]. I’ve been doing some research on literary agents, reading interviews, scouring their websites and here are a few things I’ve learned: Agents want writing [a story/book] that is: effortless, authentic, surprising, engaging, balanced, and unique. Sounds like a lot of criteria, huh? Can you honestly say that your manuscript includes some element of those qualities? If not, maybe it’s time to …

Ficiton Friday: Amoxicillin Meets Decorating Meets Literary Agent

By Leslie Lindsay Today I learned that an literary agent who I have had some “interest” in will be featured at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Writer’s Institute.  I have been to both continuing studies programs the university hosts for writers.  I love them.  I was kind of considering going again this April, but hadn’t made a formal committment.  Now that this agent is going to be there–and offering a chance for me to pitch my novel–I just may sign up.  But it scares the bejeesus outta me!  Sure–my ultimate hope is for is my book face out at a local bookstore.  Sure, I want readers.  And I guess it’s got to start somewhere, right?  That means I need to finish polishing this darn thing pronto!  That means I need to get some homework done before I pitch–what does my book compare to?  What else is out there like it?  Who do I write like?  And then I need to drop 10 lbs and get a new outfit.  Sounds so simple, right? Okay–here’s my revised chapter …

Write on Wednesday: Agents, Agents–Here’s my Story!

By Leslie Lindsay  I have been busy writing today ..so busy I almost forgot to pound out a blog post!  Yesterday, I was waaay too busy volunteering in my kindergartner’s library and managing all of the day-to-day things that a 2nd grader and her little sister have going to write something for “The Teacher is Talking.”  Oops–guess I get a failing grade for that.  Alas, I am back.  And since I am working at shaping my novel for an agent’s eyes, I thought I’d let you in a little on that process.  First of all: it’s hard.  Second of all: it’s not easy.  Redundant?  Yep.  After I did all of my “mom duties” for the day, I told my hubby over the phone, “Yep, gonna head to Caribou to work on my novel.”  He replied, “Well, it seems like an ideal day to do that…it’s dreary and you’ll be able to hole-up in a cozy coffee shop.” He makes it sound like a vacation.  And in some sense, he’s right:  I do like to write.  And I do like coffee shops.  …