All posts tagged: lost love

Wednesdays with Writers: Finding the deeper truth in fiction, his favorite place in the world, fear of the blank page and rediscovering lost love, Thomas Christopher Greene talks about his stunning new book, IF I FORGET YOU

By Leslie Lindsay  I closed this book for the last time with my heart in my throat and a deep visceral sigh. If I had been alone and not in a car traveling at eighty miles an hour filled with the giddy sounds of 5th grade girls, I might have shed a tear. And then I looked over at my husband, who was driving, and thought, “This life.”  IF I FORGET YOU (released yesterday, June 14 2016 from St. Martin’s Press/Thomas Dunne Books)began for the author as many books do for many authors. It began as a question, “What if?” Simple as that. We all wonder from time to time about that first love, about that person who made such a mark on our lives, it’s stamped on our psyche forever. And then the muse takes over. A story told from a series of fragmented memories, wonderings, a compelling force drawing the ‘what if’ to fruition. . Told from such raw, simple honesty, IF I FORGET YOU is wrapped in an delicately-spun tale of secrets, love, and …

Fiction Friday: Blast from the Past

By Leslie Lindsay Welcome back for another “Fiction Friday!”  Here is an “out-take” from my novel-in-progress.  It just doesn’t add to the story, so I chose to remove it.  But I still kind of liked it.  Perhaps it will make it’s way into something else in the future?  I find that I often go off on tangents like this to develop my characters, their backstory, and motivation.  It’s a way for me to “pre-write,” if you will, you know–get the juices flowing before I can tackle my real characters and their real problems.  For now, I am saving all of my out-takes in a document on my computer.  Perhaps they will become inspiration for another project. What do you do with the snippets that no longer work?  Okay, here goes: “There was Ellen, and Conor. They were separated at college.  She was from a working-class Irish-American family who couldn’t afford to send her away to a nice college.  Instead, she went to a small in-state institution not really well-respected, but it was better than nothing.  Conor …