All posts tagged: parent book on apraxia

Say That Again: Imagine Being a Parent of a Child with Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

By Leslie Lindsay [This was  previous post over the summer.  Here it is again if you missed it–or are just now joining us].  (image source: http://speechtherapyweb.com/ 10.15.12) At two years old, Kate was a beautiful, energetic, and happy toddler. With the exception of one word—hi—Kate was as quiet as a mouse. We wondered if something was wrong. Even as a baby, Kate rarely babbled and cried; she was beautiful and unique with red hair and bright blue eyes.  She was, in a word, “perfect.” So why were we worried? After all, she could understand everything we said, even the big words.  And what was so wrong with having a quiet, happy toddler?  But there were times my heart would sink. Gaggles of women who had all been in the same childbirth class a year or so earlier met up for our summer book discussion.  They were chattering about how their children were saying new words every day.  One mother proudly shared, “Oh, Maddie said elephant yesterday at daycare.  I hate that I missed it.”  I pulled …

Apraxia Monday: “Speaking of Apraxia” Excerpt Chapter 7

By Leslie Lindsay Here we are–back again to Monday (sigh).  Funny how that linear time thing works, huh?  I thought we’d plow right ahead where we left off before the launch of the book with another excerpt, this one is of Chapter 7:  All About Speech Therapy–Methods best suited to kids with apraxia. (From Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech, March 2012 Woodbine House).  Therapy Strategies Before we get into the nitty-gritty details of therapy strategies for CAS in particular, it’s good to know that there are two main types of approaches to speech therapy in general: 1)    The Bottom-up Approach. The SLP introduces easy to hard (simple to more complex) sounds/words such as vowels (V), as in “oh;” consonant-vowel (CV), as in “me;” vowel-consonant (VC), as in “up;” and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC), as in “mom.” 2)   The Hierarchical Approach. The SLP starts where the child is presently performing; that is, she starts with what the child can say already. Here, you will find various therapy strategies with a brief definition: Therapy …