All posts tagged: parent teacher conferences

Apraxia Monday: A Day Late and A Dollar Short, Dealing with Conferences

By Leslie Lindsay I know, I know I am late with my usual “Apraxia Monday” blog and here’s why:  it’s conference time around here …which really means the kiddos are home from school, thus decreasing my writing time.  But I have some good news and bad news:  the conferences went off without a hitch.  With one tiny little exception.  (image source: http://www.huntsville-isd.org/cms/One.aspx?portalId=2997834&pageId=10156746) This time. Let me just back-track a bit to one of the very first parent-teacher conferences we ever attended.  It was near Thanksgiving of that year.  My husband and I were all set for our annual trip to St. Louis where we spend the holiday of thanks.  The minivan was packed, the kids ready.  One last stop:  Miss Lisa’s classroom for conferences.    At the time Kate was 3 1/2 years old. She was in the school district preschool for “severe apraxia.” She had only a handful of words in her vocabulary, and some of those weren’t really words at all…more like sounds and approximations in conjuction with a gesture that we knew meant *something.* We walked into the …

The Teacher is Talking: Requesting a Conference

By Leslie Lindsay It’s that time of year again–(optional) parent-teacher conferences.  I think it works both ways: a teacher can request a conference with you, the parent(s) or you can request a conference with your child’s teacher.  Either way, it’s best to go prepared. My own daughter is struggling with two things I absolutely adore: reading and writing.  So, it was a bit of a blow when she came home one day, unpacked her backpack and procured a “Conference Request” sheet from her green folder.  How can my precious off-spring not love to read and write?!  How can she not get her work done unless she is given redirection?  Before I get my panties in a bundle, I have to remember she is just in 1st grade.  (Although, I know that 1st grade is the cornerstone of a long, and hopefully happy academic career). What’s a parent to do: Stay calm and remain neutral.  Maybe there is a good reason why these subjects are particularly challenging.  Getting to the root of the cause is key. Don’t …