All posts tagged: phonological awareness

Say that Again?! Green Eggs and Ham with a side of Apraxia

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://www.lacrosselibrary.org/index.asp) [This post previously ran over the summer.  Here it is again in case you missed it.]  I don’t know about you, but I love books.  I love kids.  And when one combines the love for children and literature, what often results is the abundance of words. And perhaps the proud moment of announcing, “Hey—she can read!” a year of two ahead of schedule.  But not if you have a child with apraxia.* And so we read.  As parents we read parenting books about late-talking children.  We read about speech development and ways to stimulate our child.  We read books to Kate.  Simple board books by Dr. Seuss and Sandra Boynton that had the happy cadence of alliteration and rhyme.  We pointed out illustrations in the book, “Oh, look-y here…can you see the birdie?  Can you say bird?”  We engaged in dialogic reading with our daughter, “What do think will happen next?”  And nothing.  Sure, she understood everything we said, even the hard words.  We could tell because she would be …

Apraxia Monday: Part 2 of Reading with CAS

By Leslie Lindsay Last week, we chatted about why it may be more difficult for our kiddos with CAS to learn to read and write.  Today, we will talk about things you can do to help your child with those skills at home; specifically reading (writing with CAS with be another two-part post beginning next week).  You want to know how to help break the code to reading?!  Sure, we all do…it’s not so clear-cut as it may sound, but I will help decipher some of the weirdness for you.  According to Joy Stackhouse, Persisting Speech Difficulties in Children:  Children’s Speech & Literacy Difficulties, one should teach phononlogical awareness skills + strong reading strategies (literacy skills) to have a kiddo who is ready to learn to read.  For phonological awareness,  some suggested repetitive books you can start with:   Anything from Sandra Boynton to Dr. Seuss (the goofier the better…it sticks with kids and gets them engaged early on) Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown…repetitive and predictable Going on A Bear Hunt (or any of the variations, such …