All posts tagged: Speaking of Apraxia book

Say That Again?!: How SLPs Can Help Parents Cope with CAS

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://flhealthykids.wordpress.com/2010/07/) If you have been reading SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012) then you know each chapter concludes with a summary called, “Say That Again?!”  In spirit of the book, this series on Apraxia Monday will be the “Say That Again” series.   Ready?  Future SLPs:  Our Children with CAS Need your TLC By Leslie Lindsay, R.N. B.S.N. You won’t soon forget her.  The red hair and blue eyes the size of saucers will linger in your memory.  So, too will the fact that she is as fire-y and energetic as that copper hair that cascades down her back, framing her freckled face with possibility.  And when you hear her speak, you may have an inkling that she once suffered from moderate to severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), or you may be none the wiser. Although Kate is a bright, creative, and eager soon-to-be 2nd grader, she has overcome a road block most of us never have to deal with: a struggle to communicate expressively.  And why do I share …

Apraxia Monday: Preparing Yourself for School

By Leslie Lindsay Sending your child back to school–or just sending her there for the first time–is nerve-wrecking.  Will she be okay?  Will she be able to verbalize her thoughts?  Answer the teacher?  Get her basic needs met?  Deep breath.  I know you have concerns.  I have been there myself.  The best thing you can do as a parent is present a happy, carefree approach to school. Kids pick up on stress and anxiety like ants on a crumb at a picnic…if they feel your anxiety, they will carry it away, too.  Now, that’s not to say that you shouldn’t worry, or you shouldn’t have questions…you do and that’s a good thing.  Writing down a list of your concerns can help, as does talking them over with your spouse/partner, your child’s teacher, a trusted friend, even your child’s SLP may have some insight.   Worry about the things you can control.  I have been known to worry about things waaay out of my control, like how is she going to get from the bus to her classroom?  But the thing …

Apraxia Monday: Finding Resources

By Leslie Lindsay I love resources.  I can’t seem to get enough books, websites, hand-outs, magazines and journal articles.  I love them!   Some people may refer to this as being an information junkie.  I, on the other hand call it nerdy.  And that is okay–for I take pride in my nerdiness! But when it comes to our kids, we can’t afford to not be a nerd.  You see, when my own daughter was diagnosed with CAS (apraxia) in 2007, I was determined to find some answers.  And while there are a great many webites and groups that have some good information out there, I was still lacking in something…and that something by-the-way is the human connection we all crave. I began Small Talk: All About Apraxia, a small-group in which parents of children with CAS could gather and get a little education on this complex neurologically-based motor speech disorder.  It was great to see all of the eager faces.  And while we all had a great time learning, chatting, and sharing tid-bits of news about childhood apraxia, some of us …

Apraxia Monday:

By Leslie Lindsay Parents who have a child with CAS so often ask, “What can I do to help my child with apraxia?”  And it’s a darn good question.  For we so often don’t really understand what apraxia is, let alone how we can help.  It kind of comes across as double-edged sword in many ways. Wish I had a magic bullet for you or a series of games and exercises that will instantly get your little one chatting up a storm–and intelligibly.  Alas, I do not.  But I have some bits of wisdom that may help you along your journey: Know how your child learns best.  Is she a “see-try it-do it” kind of kid?  Does he prefer rough and tumble play to sit and learn styles?  Does she like to see what she needs to do before doing it (by seeing a model on TV or a parent act out something).  Does he respond well to books?  As a parent, you’ll find that you need a little trial and error in this department.  Your child …