All posts tagged: THE THINGS WE KEEP

Wednesdays with Writers: What if you were all alone and had cancer? Who might take care of your children when you’re gone? Sally Hepworth explores this, as well as social anxiety, domestic violence in THE MOTHER’S PROMISE. Oh, and Bali, new motherhood, character development…

By Leslie Lindsay  A powerful and emotionally riveting portrait of what it means to be a family, A MOTHER’S PROMISE is poignant, breath-taking, and authentic, perhaps Hepworth’s best to date.  I flew through this book, not because the topics touched upon are light-hearted; but because the writing is so smooth, so effortless, so authentic and engaging. But be warned: if domestic abuse (including rough sex), miscarriage, cancer, and social anxiety are triggers for you, by all means, select this book with caution. Still, Hepworth does a remarkable job of presenting these situations in a veiled attempt so that we get the gist of what’s happening, but don’t have to relive every raw moment with her characters. Alice is a 40 year old single mother raising her daughter, fifteen year old Zoe on her own; Zoe’s father isn’t exactly in the picture. But then Alice gets sick and is given a grim prognosis, she is befriended by her R.N. and social worker who attempt (sometimes erroneously) to correct the “problem.” THE MOTHER’S PROMISE is searingly honest, emotional, and …

Write On, Wednesday: Sally Hepworth on her astonishing new novel, THE THINGS WE KEEP, love, memory, and truth in fiction

By Leslie Lindsay THE THINGS WE KEEP is a tenderly written second book from Australian Sally Hepworth. Curl up with a chai tea, a cinnamon bun (and some Kleenex), because this is the kind of story it is: sweet and spicy, gooey and warm, and afterward, you’ll feel like maybe you bit off more than you can chew. It’s a story that won’t easily go away; it lingers.  At the heart of the story is Anna, a 38-year old with early on-set dementia/Alzheimer’s. She hasn’t got long to live. She’s in a comfortable and loving environment called Rosalind House where she’s surrounded by others who are easily twice-three times her age. But there’s someone else there, Young Guy who is also in his thirties and also suffering from memory loss, they forge a friendship that transcends all expectations. Richly layered and detailed with real-life experiences of dementia, Hepworth has done her homework. I truly felt like a fly-on-the-wall as I read THE THINGS WE KEEP. It’s more than a book about dementia, it’s about human …