All posts tagged: vestibular system

Apraxia Monday: Stimulating your Kids’ Vestibular System

By Leslie Lindsay Last week’s “Apraxia Monday” was all about bouncing and boinging on a giant (supervised) trampoline.  Not only is it great fun, but also a superb cardiovasular exercise and a method to activate that vestibular system.  But just what exactly is the vestibular system?  Well, according to an article at http://connectability.ca/2011/03/24/vestibular-stimulation-tip-sheet/, “vestibular stimulation is the input that your body receives when you experience movement or gravity. It can be mild; nodding your head or climbing stairs or it can be intense; skydiving or a rollercoaster.” In SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (okay, okay…shameless plug), I mention how the vestibular system is useful in generating speech sounds.  You can find a good sampling onhttp://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/child-myths/200910/dizzy-delightful-or-irrelevant-how-did-vestibular-stimulation-get-so-much-at pages 164-69. Does all of this Sound fishy to you, too?  (see also this Psychology Today article, ).  I was in the same boat (pun intended) a few years ago.  Our evaluating SLP in Minnesota had encourged us to get our daughter on a swing “as often as possible.”  I looked out of the small window of her office.  There was snow …

Apraxia Monday: Bounce Your Way to Words

By Leslie Lindsay     (image source: http://www.prlog.org/10543846-suitable-trampoline-mats-for-your-jumping-style.html) This past weekend we took our daughters to an indoor giant trampoline facility.  Aside from the fact that this was good, wholesome family fun–and exercise–it dawned on me just how powerful jumping is for the speech-language centers of our brain.  Call it vestibular stimulation or gross motor work, or whatever but it does something to jump-start (okay, couldn’t resist), our speech and language.  Although we are no longer dealing with CAS in the instensity or severity we once were, I truly did see a change overcome Kate (now 7.9 years and in 2nd grade) as she boinged and bounced around the trampolines.  Her mind was present and engaged; she giggled as though there was no tomorrow, and she initiated a game of “mimic me.”  It went like this, “Okay, mom…I am going to do what you do [on the trampoline].”  And she did.  Not that I was all that innovative (or limber) on the giant stretchy material.  But sure, I did some seat-drops, high-knees, and straddles.  She did …