All posts tagged: ways to help your child at home

Say That Again: Giving Your Child The Gift of Voice

By Leslie Lindsay Making a list and checking it twice?  Your child may have all of the cars and trucks, dolls, & love, but don’t forget to give one very important gift: the gift of speech.  Your child was given to you as a wonderful and miraculous gift to tend to and raise, and impart life’s lessons to.  But your child also brings much to your life: laughter, love, joy, and…well, baffling questions and concerns.    (image source:http://www.sheknows.com/kids-activity-center/print/dear-santa-list) When my daughter was given the diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), I had little idea what that really meant, or how I could help.  Aside from the fact that I would be schlepping my daughter to and from speech therapy, I was dumbfounded.  I shrugged, rolled up my (elf) sleeves and accepted the challenge; I would give my daughter the gift of voice—even if I didn’t know how.  Of course, the pediatric speech-language pathologist (SLP) we worked with privately for the next few years, coupled with the special-education preschool Kate attended five days a week really helped her …

Apraxia Monday: Welcome to Better Speech & Hearing Month

By Leslie Lindsay Welcome to the month of May. For a lot of you, this is the month of crazy last days of school, Mother’s Day, Graduations, and perhaps birthdays…it’s busy.  And it’s also “Better Speech and Hearing Month.”  This annual event, sponsored by ASHA (American Speech-language Hearing Association) is a way to generate awareness and promote better treatment options for folks–big and little–who have trouble communicating and hearing.  http://www.asha.org/bhsm/.  You may also be interested in reading ASHA’s blog on the event, http://blog.asha.org/ So let’s kick off this 85-year event with a little tip sheet on how you can help your own little kiddo(s) with their speech concerns, namely CAS (childhood apraxia of speech).  DO A LITTLE DANCE, MAKE A LITTLE WORD What you need: Adult and child. What you do: The adult calls out different kinds of movements: “Touch the sky way up high—touch your toes way down low—wiggle your hips—rub your tummy.” Child plays along and can repeat words as she feels ready. Add in other body parts like nose, ears, hair, mouth, …