All posts tagged: writing exercises

WITCHES WEEK: Ariel Gore’s WE WERE WITCHES, exploring fabulous feminist fiction, poetry, witches, motherhood, and so much more, plus a writing prompt

By Leslie Lindsay A sublime genre-bending tale of teen mom Ariel Gore caught betwixt the 1990s family values or home and family, along with the hopes of redeeming herself through education, WE WERE WITCHES casts a spell like no other. ~WRITERS INTERVIEWING WRITERS~ WITCHES WEEK ALWAYS WITH A BOOK Featured Spotlight: WE WERE WITCHES by Ariel Gore Ariel Gore is the founding editor & publisher of the Alternative Press Award-winning magazine Hip Mama and the author of ten books of fiction and nonfiction. I was alerted to this book after reading and attending an online class with Laraine Herring. Her book, A CONSTELLATION OF GHOSTS: A Speculative Memoir was featured earlier this month. ABOUT WE WERE WITCHES: We Were Witches is a 2017 novel by Ariel Gore. It is a first-person narrative of a fictionalized version of the author, of her life as a teen mom and budding feminist, from the birth of her daughter when she was 18 years old, to her graduation from Mills College. This book is a little different than most, and perhaps a misnomer. …

Write on, Wednesday: Susan Elizabeth Phillips Talks about Character-Driven Plot

By Leslie Lindsay Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos, a Spanish writer, depicted with the tools of the trade. (image retrieved fromWikipedia, 5.30.12) I will admit that I am not one to fall in love with a romance novel.  It’s not that I don’t like romance–I do, it’s just that I would rather be the heroine than read about her.  Who wouldn’t, right?  But, I can appreciate a good writer when I see one…or know one…or take one of her workshops at a conference.  Which is exactly what I did about a month ago. Susan Elizabeth Phillips may be tiny, but she is big on ideas and big on being sassy.  I mean that in a good way, SEP.  She has a wit about her that is infectious.  And if you have ever read her books, you will soon come to realize that she talks just like her characters–razor-sharp, funny, and a little saucy.  She had us in stitches several times with her personal stories.  And stories, are after all, what makes us write. In “Drawing Plot …