Apraxia Monday: Staying *Focused* on Daily Routines

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By Leslie Lindsay

(image source: www.thefocusfoundation.org)

Today I would like to introduce a new resource:  The Focus Foundation (http://www.thefocusfoundation.org/FF/index.php).  It’s goal–to identify and help children who have X and Y Variations, Dyslexia and/or Developmental Dyspraxia (also called childhood apraxia of speech/CAS/apraxia).  They focus on bringing awareness to the “forgotten child.” 

I am honored to be invited to speak at their third annual Atypical Learner’s Conference in Annapolis, MD.  My topic:  apraxia, of course!  But as we all know, apraxia is more than just apraxia, it’s a big ball of wax.  So, to narrow it down a bit, I will be speaking on innovative ways in working with CAS.  Sounds like fun…and a bit of of a challenge!

When I think of innovation, what comes to mind is technology.  Nothing needs to be fancy here, no siree…but fun, hands-on, interactive and motor-based and parent involved speech practice.  (In fact, there may be a little technology if you go the route of an iPad for speech apps). 

If you are a fan of Speaking of Apraxia (Woodbine House, 2012), then you already know I am a huge proponenet of having fun and going about your typical, everyday routines while “sneaking” in speech practice.   (image source: http://www.freeprintablebehaviorcharts.com/daily%20routines.htm)

Here are some ideas:

  • In the morning shuffle, why not have your child name the items of clothing she is putting on?  “Here is my shirt.  Now my pants.”  Meet your child where she is at.  Are those words/phrases too difficult?  Tailor it for your child.  Instead of “pants,” say /p/. 
  • If you have a pet, can your child feed or groom the animal?  Have him say, “Soft fur,” or a variation of as he pets the kitty or brushes the dog. 
  • At breakfast, have your child identify what she wants to eat.  You may have to create cards (Boardmaker or use the Clip Art function of your home computer) to depict different types of breakfast food choices (cereal, oatmeal, waffle, yogurt, fruit, etc).  Laminate it if you are so inclined and then have your child point to and attempt to say those choices. 
  • Ready to go?  A friend of mine created a board in which her four children can take a quick glance to make sure they have everything ready to go for the day.  Backpack, shoes, coat, library books, etc.  Again, think clip art and Boardmaker.  Can your child practice saying some of those words? 
  • Don’t forget the car as a place to practice speech!  If you drive your child to school, use this as an opportunity to practice funtional daily phrases like, “My name is ___.”  “Bye-bye”  “Wait for me!”  “Can you play?”  If you child is older, go ahead and practice some other developmenally appropriate words/phrases/spelling words.

There are plently more opportunities to “sneak” in speech practice…what are some of your favorites? 

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