All posts tagged: apraxia of speech

Can you play with your child with NO toys? YES! Why you should, plus first words, early literacy tips, getting out in nature, and so much more in Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP’s “Learn with Less philoshophy”

By Leslie Lindsay  A practical, accessible, no-nonsense guide to understanding and connecting with your baby from a pediatric speech-language pathologist. Give–away!! I’m passing along a complimentary gently-used book bundle of both of these amazing books. Must reside in the continental U.S. to be eligible. Details below! (keep scrolling) UPDATE: Winner of the UNDERSTANDING YOUR BABY and UNDERSTANDING YOUR TODDLER by Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP is: Shruti Gangakhedkar of Beaverton, Oregon! Congratuations and thanks for all the interest. This give-away is now closed. But there’s a another coming next Monday, 1/27/20. ~APRAXIA MONDAY/BookS on MondaY~ UNDERSTANDING YOUR BABY is a MUST read for any new parent–or even a seasoned one! I love Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP’s down-to-earth, no-frills approach to connecting with your baby, how to maximize your time and efforts, and she does it all in an efficient, easily digested form. Parents are busy. They don’t have time (or energy) to read large research-heavy books on child development. And even if they do, chances are, they’re too distracted (or exhausted) to absorb the information.  A …

Apraxia Monday: Interview with Melanie Feller, CCC-SLP

By Leslie Lindsay I am excited to introduce Melanie Feller, CCC-SLP to “Apraxia Monday.”  Melanie’s article, “7 Common Myths of Childhood Apraxia of Speech” recently appeared on Special Education Advisor http://www.specialeducationadvisor.com/7-common-myths-of-childhood-apraxia-of-speech-cas/ and featured on PediaStaff as a “Worth Repeating” article.  Melanie hails from New Jersey and is currently in Oregon for a professional opportunity.  She continues to practice pediatric speech-language pathology in both locations.  L4K:  When and how did you get interested in the field of pediatric speech pathology?   Can you tell us a bit about your educational background?  How long have you been a practicing SLP?  (image source: http://www.upwardaz.org/speech-therapy/.  This is not a photo of Melanie or her practice.  The author(s) have no relationship with this company or individuals).  Melanie, CCC-SLP: As a senior in college. I was a history major, interested in anything but history, and desperately worried about what I would go to graduate school for.  After discovering a book on graduate schools, I came across “communication disorders” in a list of majors, and decided to do some research.  The information I …

In My Brain Today: Reader’s Choice Finalist

By Leslie Lindsay It is with great pleasure, awe, and humility that I share fantastic news.  SPEAKING OF APRAXIA:  A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech (Woodbine House, 2012) has advanced to the finalist stage of the Reader’s Choice Awards by About.com/Terri Mauro, mother and author.   (image source: http://specialchildren.about.com/od/readerschoice/tp/Readers-Choice-Favorite-New-Special-needs-Parenting-Book.htm.  Retrieved 2.21.13)  When I decided to write this book, I hadn’t the foggiest idea of what Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) even was.  I was the one who wanted/needed the book, I certainly didn’t think I could write one!  Published by Woodbine House, a leader in special needs parenting books, SPEAKING OF APRAXIA is currently the only book on the shelves written exclusively on apraxia for parents.  Having the book reach the finalist stage of a nationally-known award is more than a dream come true.  But I could use  your help.  Just as the award’s name suggests, obtaining the honor of the award is based solely on readers.  So, if you–your child(ren)–or your organization–have been touched by the book, childhood apraxia of speech, any speech disorder, Down’s syndrome, or …

Apraxia Monday: He Talks Funny Author Jeanne Buesser & Give-a-Way

By Leslie Lindsay   For mother Jeanne Buesser, apraxia has been near and dear to her heart.  Her son–now a senior in high school–and doing well–suffers from the neurologically-based motor speech disorder.  Jeanne is also the president of the nonprofit grassroots organization, Apraxia Network of Bergen County (New Jersey) and the author of He Talks Funny (Author House, 2010).  For more information, see Jeanne’s YouTube Channel: PSA’s, interviews, and more.   (image source: http://www.authorsden.com 2.11.13) “All the children eventually reach the top of their mountain but each has a different way of getting there.”   Designed for parents, caregivers, teachers, and children with apraxia, Ms. Buesser indicates He Talks Funny was “an idea that just popped into my head one day.” She’s not a stranger to writing, though.  Her work had appeared in the Exceptional Parent Magazine, Parentguide Magazine, and also http://www.Parentpaper.com.  She also blogs regularly at http://jeannebuesser.com He Talks Funny is a story about a young boy named Joey and his struggles with CAS, specifically about other children not being able to understand him, and as a result– not …

Apraxia Monday: It’s Yoga Time

By Leslie Lindsay Forget Hammer time…it’s yoga time!  Just recently, my daughter Kate (7.9 years and recovering from CAS) came home from school all pumped up about yoga.  Yes, yoga.  Her P.E. instructor lead a week-long segment on the benefits of yoga.  She fell in love.  (and yay for the P.E. teacher for trying something a little unconventional). Kate looked around the house for my yoga mats–she going to teach mom some “yoga moves” (forgetting all about the all-important after-school snack).  I smiled and went along with her.    Satisfied, she rolled the mats out in the basement play area and flipped on an old Enya C.D.  She even made a poster, ‘Yoga is Fun’ and a membership card.  She stood at the bottom of the stairs and fake-punched my card.  I was set for a 1:1 yoga instruction.   She lead me through a series of excercises/poses and I have to admit–some were pretty tough.  She beamed.  I don’t know if it was the fact that mommy was doing something she had learned at school, or the fact that she could …

Special Announcement: Reader’s Choice Award for SPEAKING OF APRAXIA

By Leslie Lindsay I was overwhelmed with awe and pride earlier this week when my publisher contacted me to share SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012, http://www.woodbinehouse.com) had been nominated for a Reader’s Choice award.  The idea of the book was born when my (then )2 1/2 year old daughter was diagnosed with apraxia of speech (CAS).  Being a bookish kind of gal, I wanted a comprehensive guide that would explain the ABC’s of apraxia.  I searched, and while I found some that satisfied my curiosty, I wanted more.  A writer at heart, my friends and close family encouraged me to write my own.  Fast-forward 5 years–the book has become a reality.  And now it’s up for winning an award.  I couldn’t be more grateful. But the book needs you!  From the The Readers’ Choice Awards website, “[This award] give us the opportunity to celebrate the special-needs resources that inform us, support us, inspire us, give us a laugh when we need it, and otherwise contribute to our ability to parent our kids with special needs and help our children …

Apraxia Monday: Being Thankful

By Leslie Lindsay As I sit back and think of all of the things I am thankful this past year, I am particularly thankful for a 2nd grader who has come so far on her apraxia journey.  It was nearly five years ago this month that we learned Kate had severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).  I was in complete and utter denial.  I didn’t know what apraxia was, let alone what it meant for my daughter–and the countless other children who also have the diagnosis.  But I do now.  It was 2007.  We were visiting with family in St. Louis for the holiday.  At the annual turkey dinner, I was chatting with one of my cousin-in-laws when she asked how the girls were doing.  She nodded, jutting her chin in their direction.  A mass of redheaded (2nd) cousins wrestled and played, appropriately so in the so-called “conversation pit” of the family’s ranch home.  Only Kate wasn’t conversing.  She was, in fact smiling and laughing and grunting.  She had no words.  Or, at least very few of …

Say that Again?! Green Eggs and Ham with a side of Apraxia

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://www.lacrosselibrary.org/index.asp) [This post previously ran over the summer.  Here it is again in case you missed it.]  I don’t know about you, but I love books.  I love kids.  And when one combines the love for children and literature, what often results is the abundance of words. And perhaps the proud moment of announcing, “Hey—she can read!” a year of two ahead of schedule.  But not if you have a child with apraxia.* And so we read.  As parents we read parenting books about late-talking children.  We read about speech development and ways to stimulate our child.  We read books to Kate.  Simple board books by Dr. Seuss and Sandra Boynton that had the happy cadence of alliteration and rhyme.  We pointed out illustrations in the book, “Oh, look-y here…can you see the birdie?  Can you say bird?”  We engaged in dialogic reading with our daughter, “What do think will happen next?”  And nothing.  Sure, she understood everything we said, even the hard words.  We could tell because she would be …

Say that Again: Apraxia…You just Gotta Practice

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: Shutterstock.com)  Over the summer, I was a  guest blogger on Haley’s blog, “Say What, Y’all?”  Not only do I love the title of her blog, being a former Missourian myself, but I can totally relate to having said this euphemism so many times in my “career” of being an “apraxia mom.”  Here it is again for those of you who may have missed it:  You won’t soon forget her.  The red hair and blue eyes the size of saucers will linger in your memory.  So, too will the fact that she is as fire-y and energetic as that copper hair that cascades down her back, framing her freckled face with possibility.  And when you hear her speak, you may have an inkling that she once suffered from moderate to severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), or you may be none the wiser. Although Kate is a bright, creative, and eager soon-to-be 2nd grader, she has overcome a road block most of us never have to deal with: a struggle to …

Apraxia Monday: A Gossip Columnist Shares “Speaking of Apraxia”

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://socialtimes.com/another-online-newspaper-ventures-into-socal-shopping_b43352) Talk of the Town: Gossip Queen & Child Development Expert Answers your Most Pressing Questions. Today’s Topic: Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) Saturday, September 24, 2012 Dear Miss Talks-a-Lot:  Argh!  I am so frustrated.  My 3 year old son has so much difficulty talking.  It’s like he knows what he wants to say, but he can’t quite get the words out. Everything else [developmentally] seems to be right on target, yet he just jibbers and gestures.  What could be going on?  –Frustrated in Colorado(image source: http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/wyoming/rocky-mountains) The Rocky Mountains plus the rugged beauty of Wyoming add up to Dear Frustrated in Colorado: It sounds like your son may be suffering from Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS), this neurologically based motor speech disorder is characterized by the inability to connect thoughts with verbal output.  It’s as though the child knows what he wants to say, he just cannot coordinate the muscles of articulation with his brain. Often, kids with CAS will gesture or create their own words and phrases to …