All posts tagged: apraxia of speech

Apraxia Monday: ABCs & CAS (Why Reading is Hard, How YOU Can Help)

By Leslie Lindsay We know that having children with CAS presents a different set of challenges.  From not being able to commuicate clearly to learning to read, seems there is always something we need to help our little people with .  Learning to read with CAS is topic that is often up for discussion.  Why is it so darn hard for these kiddos to learn to read?  And what can you do to help your child?  Why Is Reading Difficult for Children with CAS?  Kids with apraxia have several problem areas to consider when reading comes into the picture: Kids who aren’t making sounds accurately (or at all) may have a decreased visual representation of what letters look and sound like.   Kids with speech-language disorders may have a distorted sense of what the symbols (letters) represent (letters are symbols which represent words).   Kids with apraxia may have “differently-wired” brains, affecting the way they read, learn, and interpret information.   Children affected with CAS may have a decreased ability to coordinate the vocal track …

Apraxia Monday: Tips for Teachers

By Leslie Lindsay Your children may already be back in school–or you may have week or two before the big day.  In any case, you’re likely thinking about it–specifics, plus the extras like how you’re going to talk to your child’s teacher about CAS (if you haven’t already).  But what if you are a teacher who has a child with apraxia in your classroom this year?  Here are a few tips and ideas from parents who may help you understand what all of the hoop-la is about.  (retrieved from CASANA, 8.30.12, a YouTube video]   See this short video on Apraxia.  It’s a worth your 3 minutes!   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nN9dG5F7M0 Tips for Teachers If you are a teacher reading this, then hooray! I applaud your efforts to learn more about the kiddos in your classroom. Read the child’s IEP. If parents challenge your knowledge, make special requests, or argue for a special IEP meeting, remind them that you are on their side and please don’t take it personally.As parents we just want the very best for our children and …

Apraxia Monday (on Thursday): Teaching the Teacher about Apraxia

By Leslie Lindsay If you are like me, then you have just spent a good chunk of your evening wondering about your child’s new school year.  Who is her teacher?  What time is the bus coming?   Do I have all of the necessary school supplies?  What about shoes?  That first-day-of-school outfit?  (It’s a big day for all that in my neck of the woods here in Chicagoland).  But have you thought about how you might broach the subject of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) with your classroom teacher?  Like many, your child’s teacher may not know what CAS is–or how to help.  It’s up to you to inform them.  Short of giving them a copy of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012)–okay, shameless plus–you can do a few other things to prepare yourself and your child for a successful year in the classroom.  Teaching Your Child’s Teachers about Apraxia [excerpted from Speaking of Apraxia, Woodbine House 2012.  Available where books are sold)  Do you wonder what you should tell your child’s teacher about apraxia?  Not …

Apraxia Monday: Improving Reading Skills

  By Leslie Lindsay  If you have a child with CAS (childhood apraxia of speech), then you are probably aware that verbal communication is a bit of a…well, challenge.  It may also come as no surprise that reading and writing may also be a challenge for your little one with CAS.  You will likely start to see this struggle as your kiddo hits the later preschool years (Pre-K) moving into kindergarten. Since it’s summertime, it may be a great time to practice these skills without the pressure to perform.  You and your child can progress at a rate that is comfortable to you….and come fall, your child with apraxia is ready to put those hard-learned skills into action. But let’s start with the basics: why is it so hard for kids with CAS to read and write?  Aside from pulling out some heavy-duty texts to explain all of this, I will just provide a couple of basics: 1.  Kids who aren’t making sounds accurately–or at all–may have a decreased visual of what letters look–and sound like. …

Apraxia Monday: Dealing with the Dark Days

By Leslie Lindsay I am a day behind…but, here goes “Apraxia Monday” on Tuesday.  I’d like to share with you a few comments, emails that I have received from folks who have a child with with apraxia (CAS). “Dear Leslie, I have a son with apraxia.  While he is in intensive therapy and progressing, I am an absolute wreck.  I have been anxiously awaiting the arrival of your book for months.  Bless you for all you have done to help us parents.” And another…. “Dear Leslie, My 2.5 year old daughter has apraxia.  She has been in therapy since she was 18 months old.  Most days we go about our daily life without dwelling on apraxia too much–but I have days where I break down and fear for the future.  I need someone who can understand and relate.  It’s getting harder to see her grunt at people and have them stare at me as if I am a clueless parent.  Instead of driving her to [speech] therapy, I dream I am driving her to ballet …

Apraxia Monday: Getting to “Diagnosed with Apraxia”

By Leslie Lindsay This Just In:  I was recently asked by Pediatric Health Associates of Naperville/Plainfield, IL to be a guest blogger on their website/blog.  Here’s a brief run-down of how we got to the point of seeking out an SLP for our daughter’s suspected speech “problem.”  (at the time, we didn’t know it was apraxia).  All thanks to our pediatrician who suggested we get her speech evaluated.  Read the blog yourself here:  http://www.pedhealth.blogspot.com/ We all have a story to tell about when and how our child was ultimately diagnosed with CAS.  Do you remember the day well?  Was it a blur?  Do you wish you could forget it? It is often these stories that shape our understanding–and often outcome–of our child’s diagnosis.  If you had a chance to recreate that story with exactly all of the details that made the story more “healing”/proactive would you?  Do you believe it unfolded just the way it was *meant* to? I suppose I am of the camp that believes everything-happens-for-a-reason.  As I look back on my daughter’s …

Apraxia Monday: Excerpt from Chapter 8–Assessing Alternative Treatments for CAS

By Leslie Lindsay Here is an excerpt from Chapter 8: Fish Oil, Diet, Horses, Music & More:  Complimentary Alternative Medical Approaches (CAM) to Childhood Apraxia of Speech in “Speaking of Apraxia,” (Woodbine House, March 2012). Does “Nontraditional” Therapy Do Any Good [for children with CAS]?! Sometimes you will find scientific research that supports the treatment claims you hear or read about regardingCAMproducts, but sometimes you won’t. Many folks will ask, “So, if it’s not scientific, why bother?” It’s been my experience that parents want to know what else may help their child. Since we live in a society in which “more” sometimes equates to “better,” why stop at “just” speech therapy? Knowing about—even trying—additional therapies or remedies gives hope to parents whose kids are struggling. For children with CAS alone, it is just as beneficial to work with them on a frequent, intense basis to remediate symptoms associated with CAS. If your child has additional concerns, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) provides options to augment more traditional therapy. For instance, one parent in my Small …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 6 Excerpt

By Leslie Lindsay An excerpt from “Speaking of Apraxia:  A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech” (Woodbine House, March 2012). 6 So What Caused All of This? Theories and Medical Diagnoses Related to CAS You’d like to blame someone, anyone, for the misfortunate combination of luck and biology that lead to your child having Childhood Apraxia of Speech. But chances are, there is nothing or no one who can take the blame. There is a lot of conflicting information out there about what causes CAS. To date, the professionals can’t agree on a cause—but there are lots of theories. I am certainly no expert in CAS theory, so if you really have an interest in this topic, I urge you to seek out additional resources. The Nuts and Bolts of This Chapter A review of the ASHA 2007 Ad Hoc Technical Document on Childhood Apraxia of Speech, which summarized what is known about CAS and advanced three theories about is causes. . Familial factors, infectious diseases, and medically based diagnoses that may involved with …

Special Edition: Speaking of Apraxia is HERE!!

By Leslie Lindsay This just in:  Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech has arrived!!  I knew the book was scheduled for release Wedneday, March 28th but that as the author I would be receiving the book slightly ahead of schedule.  And it wasn’t able to be delivered to my home address, due to the need for the books–all 100–to be signed for.  So, I dutifully gave my publisher the address to my hubby’s office and waited on pins and needles to hear of the delivery. One day, about two weeks ago, my darling husband had said in passing “I can’t wait to open up those boxes and see it for myself.”  “Oh no, you don’t!” I responded.  “You will bring those books home and let me have the first look.  You will not–and I repeat–not–be opening that box at work!”  He grinned.  I wasn’t sure if he was teasing, or he just enjoyed seeing me get all fired up.  Alas, the books arrived yesterday around 1:30pm.  All 100 of them.  Each …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 5–Getting the CAS Diagnosis/Initial Reactions

By Leslie Lindsay (An excerpt from Speaking of Apraxia: A Paren’ts Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  Chapter 5: “Getting the Diagnosis and Coping with Your Initial Reactions”).    You may have been searching for years for some term to identify why your child isn’t talking like every other child. Perhaps you weren’t that concerned in the first place, but took your child to a speech-language pathologist because your friends, your mother, or a concerned neighbor or teacher urged you to. In either case, you now have a word to describe the phenomenon: Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). What’s next? Common Reactions If it took you awhile to arrive at a diagnosis, you may be feeling like your competence as a parent has been challenged.   “Gosh, I knew there was something wrong, why wouldn’t (or couldn’t) anyone tell me what it was?!”  You may feel some resentment toward any professionals you consulted who shooed you away, assuring you everything was “fine.” “I knew I was right! Those doctors were so incompetent. Their lack of competency …