All posts tagged: platform development

Write on, Wednesday: The Benefit of Book Trailers

By Leslie Lindsay No doubt you’ve heard of a movie trailer, right?  The commericial-style blurb about an upcoming or already-showing movie–a sneak-peak of the funniest/most romantic/endearing/action-packed segments that leave you eager for more.  But a book trailer?!?  What the heck is that?! Simply put, a book trailer is another means of bringing attention to a book and/or the author.  We live in a media age–from iPhones to streaming videos and music from our laptops, reading is now becoming a little well–mainstream.  Not that I agree with the novelty of it, but I do agree that there is something to say for the efficiency of electronic devices.  Again, it’s still a concept I struggle with.  If you’re into book trailers, then great!  It’s yet another avenue to reach potential readers.  Here’s a list of “fantastic book trailers and why they are so fantastic:” http://therumpus.net/2013/06/fantastic-book-trailers-and-the-reasons-theyre-so-good/  One of my favorites is from Deb Caletti’s HE’S GONE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sz-n4-TSDGA)  Wow–this one starts out almost exactly like the book (see Deb’s interview from last week’s post).  Yet, it’s different–I “saw” Dani differently in my mind’s eye and …

Write on, Wednesday! Do’s and Don’t of Fiction Platforms

By Leslie Lindsay You hear all the time, “build your platform!”  But what exactly is a platform, you say?!  Well, the terminology, platform comes from the theater in which the presentor/entertainer (that’s you, the author) is on the stage, while your “audience” (readers) are on the sidelines.  It generally means you have a place to promote your work; that is–readers who care.  Every writer will have a different strategy to developing his or her platform–it all depends on your personality, your goals as a writer, and often the types of writing you do.  Here’s a list of do’s and don’t for fiction platforms (but I think you can translate many of these to non-fiction as well).  This is literally a clipping from a Writer’s Digest magazine…but don’t ask what issue.  It’s been tacked to my real-life bulletin board over my desk for awhile now. WHAT WORKS: 1.  Local publicity; especially if you live where your novel is set (DOESN’T WORK:  mass snail maillings) 2.  Book giveaways (DOESN’T WORK:  Non-book [swag] giveaways) 3.  Wide-reaching blog tour …

Write on, Wednesday: Great Writing is Your Best Promotional Tool

By Leslie Lindsay I recently downloaded this “5 Secrets to Great Writers” guide from http://www.bookbaby.com and have been skimming through it’s contents.  The first thing I read goes like this:  “You can assemble the world’s greatest team of publicists and social marketing strategists to help you promote your book, but if the WORDS you’ve assembled in your book can’t sell themselves…well then, you are dead in the water.” Makes sense, right?  Again, I wonder what publishling house would publish a book if the author can’t write well?  (That is if you are going with a traditional publishing model and not self-publishing). But here comes the tricky part of book work.  Promoting what you have written.  There is a fine line between being good at tooting your own horn and sounding, well conceited.  Of course, no one wants to come across as arrogant.  So, how does one get the word out that their book is worthwhile? (Humm…if I knew I probably wouldn’t be writing about this!).   Here goes: Build your Brand.  You’ve probably heard this before.  It also …