All posts tagged: Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech”

APRAXIA MONDAY series 1/4: does my child have apraxia of speech (CAS)? plus, leslie lindsay reads from speaking of apraxia, hints & Tips for selecting an SLP, more

By Leslie Lindsay  Author of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA reads from the first few pages of of the book, discusses how to find a speech-language pathologist (SLP).  ~APRAXA MONDAY|ALWAYS WITH A BOOK~ Spotlight: Does my child have apraxia of speech (CAS) 1/4?  Years ago, as a new mom, I was so, so eager to hear those first, tender words from my first child. When they didn’t come, I worried. But then I thought, “kids develop at different rates, it’s no big deal.” When others–my mom-friends, the neighbors, the pediatrician–raised an eyebrow, I was even more worried. After all, Kate could hear and seemed to understand everything we said. So what was the problem?  Here, I read a bit from the first few pages of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2020), which might help put things in perspective.    #1 Amazon bestseller in communication disorders/special education “So impressed with this awesome work! Every chapter was SO easy to get through and jam-packed with gold nuggets for parents and caregivers!” Your next step, if you’re truly concerned about …

APraxia Monday: Leslie LINDSAY & Daughter Kate in conversation about SPEAKING OF APRAXIA: A Parents’ guide to childhood apraxia of speech 1/2

By Leslie Lindsay  Author’s 15-year old daughter interviews her mom on SPEAKING OF APRAXIA.  ~APRAXIA MONDAY|ALWAYS WITH A BOOK~ A Mother-Daughter Conversation about CAS Part 1 of 2 Now available in an updated, second edition, SPEAKING OF APRAXIA: A Parents’ Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech (Woodbine House, December 2020), is an award-winning resource on Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). Eight years ago, when Leslie Lindsay, former Child & Adolescent Psychiatric R.N., and mother to a daughter with CAS—now resolved—couldn’t find any parent-friendly books to help her child and family with CAS, she wrote one. This updated, well-researched, and comprehensive work provides readers the benefit of her experience and perspective. It covers: introduction to speech, language & listening explanation of CAS what to do when you suspect your child has CAS getting a speech evaluation meeting with a speech-language pathologist getting the CAS diagnosis possible causes diagnoses related to CAS speech therapy best suited for CAS complementary & alternative approaches activities & materials to support therapy at home creating a language-rich environment for speech coping with …

Can you play with your child with NO toys? YES! Why you should, plus first words, early literacy tips, getting out in nature, and so much more in Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP’s “Learn with Less philoshophy”

By Leslie Lindsay  A practical, accessible, no-nonsense guide to understanding and connecting with your baby from a pediatric speech-language pathologist. Give–away!! I’m passing along a complimentary gently-used book bundle of both of these amazing books. Must reside in the continental U.S. to be eligible. Details below! (keep scrolling) UPDATE: Winner of the UNDERSTANDING YOUR BABY and UNDERSTANDING YOUR TODDLER by Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP is: Shruti Gangakhedkar of Beaverton, Oregon! Congratuations and thanks for all the interest. This give-away is now closed. But there’s a another coming next Monday, 1/27/20. ~APRAXIA MONDAY/BookS on MondaY~ UNDERSTANDING YOUR BABY is a MUST read for any new parent–or even a seasoned one! I love Ayelet Marinovich, M.A., CCC-SLP’s down-to-earth, no-frills approach to connecting with your baby, how to maximize your time and efforts, and she does it all in an efficient, easily digested form. Parents are busy. They don’t have time (or energy) to read large research-heavy books on child development. And even if they do, chances are, they’re too distracted (or exhausted) to absorb the information.  A …

Apraxia Monday: Bounce Your Way to Words

By Leslie Lindsay     (image source: http://www.prlog.org/10543846-suitable-trampoline-mats-for-your-jumping-style.html) This past weekend we took our daughters to an indoor giant trampoline facility.  Aside from the fact that this was good, wholesome family fun–and exercise–it dawned on me just how powerful jumping is for the speech-language centers of our brain.  Call it vestibular stimulation or gross motor work, or whatever but it does something to jump-start (okay, couldn’t resist), our speech and language.  Although we are no longer dealing with CAS in the instensity or severity we once were, I truly did see a change overcome Kate (now 7.9 years and in 2nd grade) as she boinged and bounced around the trampolines.  Her mind was present and engaged; she giggled as though there was no tomorrow, and she initiated a game of “mimic me.”  It went like this, “Okay, mom…I am going to do what you do [on the trampoline].”  And she did.  Not that I was all that innovative (or limber) on the giant stretchy material.  But sure, I did some seat-drops, high-knees, and straddles.  She did …

Apraxia Monday: Practicing Pirate Poems

By Leslie Lindsay She shuffles her feet and looks up at me, a smirk growing across her face.  I nod and prompt her to continue.  “I’m Captian Kid…my treasure is hid.” Her voice is strikingly loud and clear.  My heart speeds up a little.  You can do it, kiddo!  It reminds me a lot of the time I sat (hugely pregnant with #2) in a cramped speech-pathologist’s office when this same little girl was being evaluated for a “speech delay.”  You can do it, kiddo!  I chanted in my mind.  Only back then it was simple imitation tasks like, “can you say, ‘moo?’ ” Fastforward, nearly 6 years and this little girl–the one who couldn’t say ‘mama’ at  2 years old–is now reciting poems in 2nd grade.  She has childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).  Chances are, if you are reading this then you care deeply about a child with delayed speech or CAS.  It’s hard.  It’s baffling.  It’s discouraging.  But, I tell you…with proper interention (frequent, intense, and continuous) speech therapy with a qualified SLP, your child will …

Say that Again: Apraxia…You just Gotta Practice

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: Shutterstock.com)  Over the summer, I was a  guest blogger on Haley’s blog, “Say What, Y’all?”  Not only do I love the title of her blog, being a former Missourian myself, but I can totally relate to having said this euphemism so many times in my “career” of being an “apraxia mom.”  Here it is again for those of you who may have missed it:  You won’t soon forget her.  The red hair and blue eyes the size of saucers will linger in your memory.  So, too will the fact that she is as fire-y and energetic as that copper hair that cascades down her back, framing her freckled face with possibility.  And when you hear her speak, you may have an inkling that she once suffered from moderate to severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), or you may be none the wiser. Although Kate is a bright, creative, and eager soon-to-be 2nd grader, she has overcome a road block most of us never have to deal with: a struggle to …

Apraxia Monday: Tips for Teachers

By Leslie Lindsay Your children may already be back in school–or you may have week or two before the big day.  In any case, you’re likely thinking about it–specifics, plus the extras like how you’re going to talk to your child’s teacher about CAS (if you haven’t already).  But what if you are a teacher who has a child with apraxia in your classroom this year?  Here are a few tips and ideas from parents who may help you understand what all of the hoop-la is about.  (retrieved from CASANA, 8.30.12, a YouTube video]   See this short video on Apraxia.  It’s a worth your 3 minutes!   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nN9dG5F7M0 Tips for Teachers If you are a teacher reading this, then hooray! I applaud your efforts to learn more about the kiddos in your classroom. Read the child’s IEP. If parents challenge your knowledge, make special requests, or argue for a special IEP meeting, remind them that you are on their side and please don’t take it personally.As parents we just want the very best for our children and …

Apraxia Monday (on Thursday): Teaching the Teacher about Apraxia

By Leslie Lindsay If you are like me, then you have just spent a good chunk of your evening wondering about your child’s new school year.  Who is her teacher?  What time is the bus coming?   Do I have all of the necessary school supplies?  What about shoes?  That first-day-of-school outfit?  (It’s a big day for all that in my neck of the woods here in Chicagoland).  But have you thought about how you might broach the subject of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) with your classroom teacher?  Like many, your child’s teacher may not know what CAS is–or how to help.  It’s up to you to inform them.  Short of giving them a copy of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012)–okay, shameless plus–you can do a few other things to prepare yourself and your child for a successful year in the classroom.  Teaching Your Child’s Teachers about Apraxia [excerpted from Speaking of Apraxia, Woodbine House 2012.  Available where books are sold)  Do you wonder what you should tell your child’s teacher about apraxia?  Not …

Apraxia Update: One Week Till The Walk in Michigan

By Leslie Lindsay Just one week to go till I make an appearance at the SE Michigan walk for apraxia.  It’s going to be a fun time as we all support a complex, neurologically-based motor speech disorder (gosh, that’s a mouthful…ironically).  Here’s some information that you may find handy as you make plans for the weekend, from the Apraxia-Kids website (who sponsors the walks nationwide): http://www.apraxia-kids.org/faf/help/helpEventInfo.asp?ievent=1013204&lis=1&kntae1013204=9DFC408896BF4EFDBF20FBC3D5A67093 I’ll be there with my own family–a daughter who is also recovering from CAS–and maybe even a basset hound (who could use some speech therapy because all she seems to do is grunt and groan…it’s such a harsh life she leads).  Naaa…we’ll probably leave Miss Sally Mae at home under the care of our neighbors.  Joking aside, this is a serious matter and I am honored to be asked to attend the walk.  Not only will I be there supporting a good cause, but a lovely family who was part of my Small Talk: All About Apraxia group spring 2011.  I’ll also have books available for purchase/signing ($20 cash, suggested …

Apraxia Monday: Improving Reading Skills

  By Leslie Lindsay  If you have a child with CAS (childhood apraxia of speech), then you are probably aware that verbal communication is a bit of a…well, challenge.  It may also come as no surprise that reading and writing may also be a challenge for your little one with CAS.  You will likely start to see this struggle as your kiddo hits the later preschool years (Pre-K) moving into kindergarten. Since it’s summertime, it may be a great time to practice these skills without the pressure to perform.  You and your child can progress at a rate that is comfortable to you….and come fall, your child with apraxia is ready to put those hard-learned skills into action. But let’s start with the basics: why is it so hard for kids with CAS to read and write?  Aside from pulling out some heavy-duty texts to explain all of this, I will just provide a couple of basics: 1.  Kids who aren’t making sounds accurately–or at all–may have a decreased visual of what letters look–and sound like. …