All posts tagged: Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech”

Apraxia Monday: Assessment and Diagnosis, an excerpt from Chapter 4

By Leslie Lindsay Here’s chapter 4 from Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  Here, you’ll get a glimpse of what it’s like to go to the very first (initial assessment) appointment with your child, what the SLP is doing and why…read on to learn more. At the Appointment : You’re there. You might be excited, nervous, indifferent, or in complete denial. Depending on the type of SLP you have—and how she or he prefers to work—you’ll likely see a combination approach to formal and informal testing at your first appointment. If your SLP is completely informal, you may be skeptical of his or her approach. “How can playing with Play-Doh and blowing bubbles really help?” you may wonder. Your SLP should have enough toys to hold your child’s attention for a good hour or so. You’ll want to feel like you just walked into a toy superstore. But on another note, it should be organized and well-maintained, and not too overwhelming. A good SLP will know this and perhaps only …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 1

By Leslie Lindsay Welcome to the first installment of a series of excerpts of forthcoming, “Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech” (Woodbine House, March 2012).  Here we begin at the beginning: chapter one.  You may have some suspicions that your child isn’t talking like he or she should; maybe you’ve heard of apraxia (CAS), but you just aren’t sure if that is why your little punkin isn’t chatting like all of the other children. Consider these scenarios: “Sarah, age 2, was a puzzle to her parents. She was obviously quite bright and alert. She knew the names of all the birds in her Big Book of Birds and would point to the cardinal, chickadee, etc. when asked. But she struggled to say even the simplest words.” “Jake was an active three-year-old who loved cause and effect, an engineer in the making.  He appeared to be a typically-developing child, with one exception: he was not talking. His grandmother kept saying, “Boys are late to talk–don’t worry.” But his parents were concerned. …

Apraxia Monday: Hugh Laurie

By Leslie Lindsay Let it be no secret that I have a Hollywood crush on the good doctor who likes to play bad.  Yes, it is true–the complex and wickedly clever Dr. Gregory House has given me a little something to look forward to Monday nights.  I don’t know if it’s the character he plays that I like or his real-life persona.  I actually think it’s a little of both: a wonderful combination of the medical meets musical.  I don’t know, but this fictional guy I have created has definitely tugged at my heartstrings. So, what does this have to do with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)?!  Ha.  Well…hummm…  Here’s what I would like to have it to do with CAS: Dr. House is wearing a gray tee-shirt, stethoscope draped around his neck, black backgroud.  He says, “Childhood Apraxia of Speech…let’s give these kids a voice.”  And that’s it.  It was like a “More You Know” PSA.  And it was a dream.  Definitely a dream. But it got me thinking…I wonder if somehow I could …

Write on, Wednesday: Advice from my 6yo

By Leslie Lindsay So, my 6 1/2 year-old daughter and I had lunch today at Panera.  As we were nibbling on our Valentine shortbread cookie, I asked her, “So how do you come up with ideas for your stories?”   She cocked her head, red hair falling about her shoulders and said, “Well, I just look around me and come up with something I see in the world.” I nodded and replied with, “Yeah.  That’s a good way to do it.” “Like that fly,” she continued.  “I could write what it’s like to be a fly who lives in the restaurant.” “Sure,” I responded.  “That would be an interesting story.” And that was about the end of that discussion. You see, as usual my little sprite is onto something.  Writing comes from within.  And while it’s true that writing is an excercise in introspection, it is fueled by your surroundings, your experiences, your philosophy on life. So, get out there and find a little slice of life you’d like to explore.  Or just be a fly on …

Apraxia Monday: iPads

By Leslie Lindsay I have a bit of a confession to make:  I have an iPad, but it’s still in the box, unopened.  You see, I wanted one for Christmas.  I even went so far as to ask my parents for it when they asked what I’d like for Christmas, “An iPad for the whole family to use would be nice,” I had said, matter-of-factly.  “Well, that’s a pretty spendy gift,” they responded with. What I got instead was some cash to apply to the fabulous techy device along with some other items (basset hound p.j.s for one were at the top of my list).  Don’t get me wrong: I am not complaining.  I am much appreciative. So, one day after Christmas I went toting my Christmas cash to the local Apple store.  “I want an iPad,” I so decisively told the man in the blue tee-shirt. “Okay!  I can help you with that,” he shuffled me over to the display case where I would find two iPads–one white, the other black.  I told him …

Apraxia Monday: Get Your Copy!!

By Leslie Lindsay It’s been a long time coming, but I am proud to announce that my book, “Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech” is now available for pre-order on the Woodbine House website, http://www.woodbinehouse.com.  (book is actually due out in March 2012). Here’s a link to the book, http://www.woodbinehouse.com/main.asp_Q_product_id_E_978-1-60613-061-2 But let’s back the speech train up.  How did this happen?  And what is speech apraxia, anyway? For starters, I will tell you that this has not been an easy process.  Writing is hard.  Getting a publisher harder yet.  Writing and parenting a child with apraxia–the hardest. You see, my daughter and I have been on this journey of learning and getting through a complicated process together…she was battling with CAS (childhood apraxia of speech), and I battling the inner demons that go along with writing…Can I do this?  Will anyone care?  Can I secure a publisher?  You know, all of those self-deprecating thoughts: I’m no good.  This sucks.  I just want to toss my lap-top out the window.  Blah. …

Write on, Wednesday: The Process of Writing

By Leslie Lindsay Everyone wants to have written, but no one wants to write.  Writing is not glamorous.  Writing is hard work.  Darn hard.  But it sure sounds cool to say, “Oh, yeah I wrote that.”  So, what to do?  Well, for starters: write. You see, writing is a process.  It is a series of tiny little baby steps.  That’s why it takes so long.  Trust me, I know.  After having just completed my first manuscript, secured a publisher, and gone through the tedious task(s) of having a peer review board, the grueling revisions, and all of the middle of the night cold sweats, I am aware at just how hard it is to write. But I did it.  And I am glad I did.  Truth be told, I will do it again (gosh, sounds a little like childbirth, huh?) But it will be awhile–at least till I produce another  book.  Of course, I will continue to write every day.  For daily jots–in the computer or the old-fashioned way on paper–is what we writers need to do to …