Tot Talk Tuesday: Sick Day

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You’re a parent, so you’ve likely been “on-call” in the middle of the night when your child isn’t feeling well. 

 “Mooommmmm….I don’t feel so good.”  You wiggle out of your warm slumber, shake the cobwebs from your head, and place your wobbly legs on the floor.  Padding down the hallway to your child’s room, your heart breaks.  She is sick.  She needs you. 

Last night this scenario happened here at our house.  Kelly was sitting up in her bed in her fleece footed jammies with the nickname, “snuggle bunny” embroidered on them, complete with bunny feet.  Of course, their was laundry to do and a kid who just didn’t feel well. 

We changed clothes, washed up, and snuggled.   True to the nickname, Kelly is a little “snuggle bunny.”  We talked about what hurt and where, I felt to see if she had a fever (nope), and we decided it was time to go back to bed. 

 Just as I was leaving her room, she asked, “Can you read me a book, momma?”  Who could resist?  “Why sure, honey buns.  What book do you to want to read?” 

She told me she wanted the “good-night one.”  At 1:30 in the morning every book is a “good-night” book.  I pressed a little more.  “You know, momma.  The one with the bunny in the room with the old lady.”  Ah, yes…”Good Night Moon.”  I found the book on the shelf, crawled into bed with my own little bunny and began reading.  Only I started to drift off.  One sentence in.  Kelly had to help me with the next word.  After reading and tucking her in again, she said in her delicate little voice, “Thank you, momma.”  Needless to say, that melted my heart.

Now if that wasn’t precious enough, then it must have been in the morning when she told me she actually wanted to go to preschool.  Can’t blame a kid who just wants to learn and be with her friends. 

What should you do if youhave a little “barf bunny” of your own?

  • Kids pick up germs quickly–there’s often no precursor to getting sick. 
  • That said, they are pretty resilient.  They often get well fast. 
  • Allow them to sip liquids first.  Start with clear liquids–anything you can see through…seltzer, some juice, water.  Give it to them every 5-15 minutes.  If they keep it down for an hour, try a little more next time.  (Other ideas: popcicles, jello, orange slices/madarin oranges, cold grapes)
  • The next step is a “full liquid diet“–that is, food that is liquid at room temperature (ice cream, pudding, yogurt, milk products)
  • Try a cracker or two…how does that “stay down?”
  • How about the “BRAT” diet…bananas, rice, apples, toast
  • Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate! 
  • Avoid Pepto-Bismal.  You want your child to get it out of their system. Coating the tummy with a medication like this just maskes the symptoms.  As unpleasant as it is, you have to let them  “barf it out.” 
  • Try Electrolyte pops…Pedialyte makes a variety that you can often find at Walgreens or another drug store
  • 

And when you can’t think of anything else….just snuggle your little bunny and read “Good Night Moon.”  She’s sure to thank  you. 

About leslie1218

Author of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012) frantically working on a novel that should be ready for submission this fall. Mom of two spritely redheads & one chubby basset hound whose stories & images appear in my writing from time-to-time.

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