All posts tagged: apraxia

Apraxia Monday: Helen Keller

By Leslie Lindsay About a month or so ago, my family  read Who Was Helen Keller by Gare Thompson.  It’s a small book, designed for kiddos in the 1-4th grades.  You may know Helen Keller as the deaf and blind young woman who became quite famous for her writing and later appearance in the movie “Deliverance.”  You may not know much at all.  And  that’s okay, too!   Grab your notepad, it’s time for a history lesson. (image source: Amazon.com 4.22.13) With my two girls snuggled on my lap after bathtime and a busy day, we dove into Helen’s dark, silent world.  Born in 1880 in Alabama to a farmer/newspaper editor and a housewife, Helen was a beautiful–and bright baby.  She learned to speak early.  Her first words were “tea, tea, tea” and “wah-wah” for water.  If she didn’t know words for things, she made signals to show her mother what she wanted  (sound familiar?) But just before Helen turned two years old, she became very sick with a fever.  In fact, her doctor thought she wouldn’t make it.  …

Apraxia Monday: Staying *Focused* on Daily Routines

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://www.thefocusfoundation.org) Today I would like to introduce a new resource:  The Focus Foundation (http://www.thefocusfoundation.org/FF/index.php).  It’s goal–to identify and help children who have X and Y Variations, Dyslexia and/or Developmental Dyspraxia (also called childhood apraxia of speech/CAS/apraxia).  They focus on bringing awareness to the “forgotten child.”  I am honored to be invited to speak at their third annual Atypical Learner’s Conference in Annapolis, MD.  My topic:  apraxia, of course!  But as we all know, apraxia is more than just apraxia, it’s a big ball of wax.  So, to narrow it down a bit, I will be speaking on innovative ways in working with CAS.  Sounds like fun…and a bit of of a challenge! When I think of innovation, what comes to mind is technology.  Nothing needs to be fancy here, no siree…but fun, hands-on, interactive and motor-based and parent involved speech practice.  (In fact, there may be a little technology if you go the route of an iPad for speech apps).  If you are a fan of Speaking of Apraxia (Woodbine House, 2012), …

Apraxia Monday: Give-a-Way & Interview with Author of “My nAMe is mILLy”

By Leslie Lindsay Here’s a special treat–interview with mom times 4 and author of the recently released children’s book, hi My nAMe is MiLLY, Heather Ziessler.   [all images courtesy of Heather Ziessler] Thanks a bunch for taking the time to chat with us, Heather.  We are super-excited to learn about your new book for kids on apraxia, specifically siblings.   Let’s start by getting to know you a bit. Thank you for having me here.  I am delighted to share my passion for helping other families who are experiencing CAS. L4K:  First of all, you are a busy mother of four—one of which has CAS.  Can you tell us a little about the family you are raising and how they have accepted your child with apraxia?  H.Z.: I certainly can, Leslie.  I am married with 4 children, 3 boys and a girl who are currently in elementary and middle school.  As far as sibling acceptance within the family goes, the children have never known anything different.  We have worked very hard as a family to provide a …

Apraxia Monday: Growing up with Apraxia

By Leslie & Kate Lindsay Hi, my name is Kate.  I am seven years old and I’m in the 2nd grade.  I love to draw and play, especially outside.  I have a passion for building and creating things.  I am an inventor.  And I have apraxia.  That means it’s hard for me to get my thoughts out sometimes.  Big words are hard for me to say.  I need a lot of practice to talk like you do. This is my mom.  Her name is Leslie.  I just call her “mom.”  She is also an author.  She wrote SPEAKING OF APRAXIA because she wanted to be able to help me and other kids with apraxia.  And their families.  Before she wrote this book, she was a nurse.  She really likes helping people.   (CAPTION:  Me and my sister with a puppy) When someone asks me what apraxia is, I just tell them that it’s not serious.  I know you’ll probably roll your eyes like I do sometimes.  I bet you’re worried about apraxia.  That’s okay.  My mom …

Apraxia Monday: It’s Yoga Time

By Leslie Lindsay Forget Hammer time…it’s yoga time!  Just recently, my daughter Kate (7.9 years and recovering from CAS) came home from school all pumped up about yoga.  Yes, yoga.  Her P.E. instructor lead a week-long segment on the benefits of yoga.  She fell in love.  (and yay for the P.E. teacher for trying something a little unconventional). Kate looked around the house for my yoga mats–she going to teach mom some “yoga moves” (forgetting all about the all-important after-school snack).  I smiled and went along with her.    Satisfied, she rolled the mats out in the basement play area and flipped on an old Enya C.D.  She even made a poster, ‘Yoga is Fun’ and a membership card.  She stood at the bottom of the stairs and fake-punched my card.  I was set for a 1:1 yoga instruction.   She lead me through a series of excercises/poses and I have to admit–some were pretty tough.  She beamed.  I don’t know if it was the fact that mommy was doing something she had learned at school, or the fact that she could …

Apraxia Monday: Interview with Cari Ebert, CCC-SLP

By Leslie Lindsay Today I have a special guest interview, Cari Ebert, CCC-SLP of Summit Speech Therapy and fellow speechie blogger.  Thanks a bunch for taking the time to chat with us, Cari.  We are excited to learn speech tips and tricks for the early childhood set from someone who is so well-versed (sorry, couldn’t resist), in the field.  Let’s start by getting to know you a bit. (image source: http://www.blogger.com/profile/06868042271330481283.  Reetrieved 1.21.13) L4K: When and how did you get interested in the field of pediatric speech pathology?  Is it something that has always been an interest of yours, or did it evolve along with your academic career?  CE, SLP: I actually started my career working with adults in long-term care.  I worked in skilled nursing facilities and had a special interest in patients who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. After having my first daughter, however, I was so amazed watching her grow and develop that I switched gears, and became a pediatric speech-language pathologist.   I now work primarily in early intervention (EI) with the …

Apraxia Monday: Bounce Your Way to Words

By Leslie Lindsay     (image source: http://www.prlog.org/10543846-suitable-trampoline-mats-for-your-jumping-style.html) This past weekend we took our daughters to an indoor giant trampoline facility.  Aside from the fact that this was good, wholesome family fun–and exercise–it dawned on me just how powerful jumping is for the speech-language centers of our brain.  Call it vestibular stimulation or gross motor work, or whatever but it does something to jump-start (okay, couldn’t resist), our speech and language.  Although we are no longer dealing with CAS in the instensity or severity we once were, I truly did see a change overcome Kate (now 7.9 years and in 2nd grade) as she boinged and bounced around the trampolines.  Her mind was present and engaged; she giggled as though there was no tomorrow, and she initiated a game of “mimic me.”  It went like this, “Okay, mom…I am going to do what you do [on the trampoline].”  And she did.  Not that I was all that innovative (or limber) on the giant stretchy material.  But sure, I did some seat-drops, high-knees, and straddles.  She did …

Happy New Year!!

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://www.okwalls.com/rgb-happy-new-year-2013-hd-wallpaper/rgb-happy-new-year-2013-hd-wallpaper/) Happy 2013!!  I’m Leslie–a mom, wife, blogger, basset hound lover, and author of SPEAKING OF APRAXIA (Woodbine House, 2012).  The book was most definitetly a labor of love as my oldest daughter–now 7 1/2 years–and doing great–struggled with CAS.  There’s also a companion Facebook page for the book.  Check it out here:  http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=hp#!/pages/Speaking-of-Apraxia-A-Parents-Guide-to-Childhood-Apraxia-of-Speech/235772599837084 Are you also walking the CAS path?  A pediatric SLP?  Follow along on “Apraxia Mondays.”  Have ideas for this segment of the blog?  Want to be featured as an “apraxia parent?”  Would you like to highlight some of your SLP achievements, tips, and ideas as a guest blogger?  Just shoot me an email or leave a comment.  leslie_lindsay@hotmail.com I am feverishly working on my second book–a novel (women’s fiction), which is a big shift from my first book.  You’ll see glimpses of this work-in-progress on my “Fiction Friday” blogs.  And since I write, I read.  You may benefit from that , as I often get inside scoops on the next up-and-coming books and authors.  Sometimes I post author interviews, …

Apraxia Monday: So this is Christmas

By Leslie Lindsay  (image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/yarnattacks/5222187096/) Welcome to the last “Apraxia Monday” for the 2012 calendar year.  I hope it’s been a good one… As I was baking bread earlier today, this song by John Lennon was playing.  It’s twang and rhyme was a bit lolling and I found myself caught in an insightful moment.  “The near and the dear one…the old and the young…and what have you done?”  Chances are, if you are a parent of a child with CAS, then you have done a lot for your dear young one.  As you take a moment to reflect back on your child and his progress throughout the past year, what comes to mind?  The first time she got on the bus, turning to you to smile and wave one last time before the bus drove off? A break-through sound/word/phrase?  One year, for us it was the ST-blend.  What a fun accomplishment! When she recited her poem in language arts without a blip–gestures and props a plus. When he could finally request that he wanted …

Apraxia Monday: Being Thankful

By Leslie Lindsay As I sit back and think of all of the things I am thankful this past year, I am particularly thankful for a 2nd grader who has come so far on her apraxia journey.  It was nearly five years ago this month that we learned Kate had severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).  I was in complete and utter denial.  I didn’t know what apraxia was, let alone what it meant for my daughter–and the countless other children who also have the diagnosis.  But I do now.  It was 2007.  We were visiting with family in St. Louis for the holiday.  At the annual turkey dinner, I was chatting with one of my cousin-in-laws when she asked how the girls were doing.  She nodded, jutting her chin in their direction.  A mass of redheaded (2nd) cousins wrestled and played, appropriately so in the so-called “conversation pit” of the family’s ranch home.  Only Kate wasn’t conversing.  She was, in fact smiling and laughing and grunting.  She had no words.  Or, at least very few of …