All posts tagged: kids

A little dog saves the girl he loves in a house fire–for young readers–DIGGER

By Leslie Lindsay  A touching story for young readers about a little dog who saves the girl he loves when their house experiences a fire due to a gas leak.  Told in verse from the POV of little Digger, a blond terrier, and Kilee’s sidekick who watches as ‘his girl’ is badly burned during a home gas explosion. Digger barks and barks and barks, alerting neighbors that something is wrong, and waking Kilee when she falls unconscious. DIGGER THE HERO DOG is intended for young readers and their caregivers. The illustrations are bold and colorful and portray a very close likeness to the real Kilee and Digger.The traumatic pieces of the story are glazed over but the important message is about gas safety and the love of a dog for his girl. The end of the book contains information about Shriner’s Hospital, gas safety (including a scratch-n-sniff sticker so kids can identify the smell of gas). This is an important read and one kids—especially animal lovers—will identify. May is also National Pet Awareness Month, so what better time than …

BookS on MondaY: Husband-Wife creative team talk about their new children’s book, MY PANCAKES TASTE DIFFERENT TODAY, the environment, and a mouthwatering discussion on a breakfast staple.

By Leslie Lindsay  Can a pancake save the world? That’s the question this delightful children’s tale sets out to seek.  Before going fishing one day, Ethan eats his favorite breakfast–pancakes! As his mom explains how pancakes are made with the help of the sun, clouds, rain, animals, and farmers, Ethan sees the world in a new way.  While playing outside, Ethan decides to create a big splash by throwing a can of in the lake and accidentally contaminates the environment. Time passes and one day Ethan notices that his pancakes taste different. Could that can in the lake have made that change? Ethan enlists the help of his friends to correct his mistake. Do Ethan and his friends repair that mistake, but most of all–what do they learn in the process? Today, I am honored to have Bruce Galpert here to chat with us…over a big plate of pancakes!  Leslie Lindsay: I’m always curious about what inspired the idea behind stories, what drives someone to spend countess hours crafting a story…can you tell us your …

BookS on MondaY: Paul Tough talks about his new book, HELPING CHILDREN SUCCEED, grit, self-c0ntrol, the environment to keep kids motivated for success, & much more

By Leslie Lindsay   One of my very favorite parts of my job is to get acquainted with authors and their amazing new books before they become available. Just recently, I received this lovely little gem of a book from the folks at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and just had to share. HELPING CHILDREN SUCCEED: What Works and Why by Paul Tough (releasing tomorrow, May 24, 2016). Did you happen to read his first…er, helping,  the bestselling HOW CHILDREN SUCCEED (2012) about grit, curiosity, and character? Grit. I love grit. And curiosity. And how those two qualities merge to develop character…I’m all over that. Today, I am honored to sit down and have a little chat with Paul on his latest book, a slim, jam-packed, how-to (in a sense) on creating environments, both at home and school which sharpen those very qualities to help our kids flourish. This is excellent reading for teachers and parents alike. Leslie Lindsay: What is HELPING CHILDREN SUCCEED about? Paul Tough: It’s about what children need in order to thrive – especially …

Write on Wednesday: Sharon Guskin talks about her smashing novel THE FORGETTING TIME, reincarnation, how novels are like magnets, crawling around the dark with a flashlight, eliminating 80 pages, and so much more

By Leslie Lindsay  THE FORGETTING TIME is a jaw-dropping, intelligent novel about the power of love, reincarnation, and motherhood. What if what you did mattered more because life happened again and again, the consequences unfolding against continents, decades, and race? What if you are a mother who will stop at nothing for her young son, the one who wants to go home, the only trouble is: he’s already there? Everything with Noah is hard. His mother, Janie will concur. He’s terrified of water, so getting him to bathe is a battle she chooses to ignore. He smells and says odd things to classmates at his preschool. What’s more, he has debilitating nightmares that often scares Janie, too. But no one knows how to help Noah. Until we meet Jerome Alexander, M.D. a man who has his share of worries, but is quite intrigued with the scientific aspects of reincarnation. In fact, he’s spent his life’s work on tracking down such cases, researching, and writing about it. What Sharon Guskin has done for THE FORGETTING TIME …

In My Brain Today: The Value of the Childhood Swing Set

By Leslie Lindsay [This post originally aired on 5.27.14 on my other site, http://www.speakingofapraxia.com. Repeated here for fun and well, it’s still in my brain]. I don’t know about you, but I have about a million and eight memories on my childhood swingset. Juicy, sticky twin-pops running orange and cheery and grape flavored sugar water down my wrists and puddling in that little space on the other side of my elbow. Of course there was the putting the damn thing together, a project in which I heard my dad curse for the first time, the metal parts lined up a jumble that no man could disentangle. “Don’t ever say that word,” he cautioned. “Oh? Okay.” I didn’t even know what gosh-dang-it, or rumpy-pumpy-poo-poo-head meant, but it didn’t sound good. Note to self: don’t put together a swing set lest you’ll spew out words that make no sense. I recall swinging back and forth on the double-sided glider thing-y and feeling like the whole swing set would pull right out of the ground and topple over …

The Teacher is Talking: Special Back-to-School Series

By Leslie Lindsay Has your summer flown by…or are you counting down the days till your wee ones head back? Perhaps you’re worried about a few things–maybe your child is starting a new school…or, she’s not very good at making first impressions, staying organized, or playing fair.  Now’s the perfect time to begin working with your child on some of those skills as you polish up the back-to-school shoes and shop for glue sticks.  Follow along as we discuss a different topic related to school readiness each week now through the August.  Topics include: Back to School Stress & Anxiety Easy Transitioning to a New Grade or School Social Skills & 1st  Impressions Organizational & Memory Strategies Self-Esteem & Positive Behavior Playing Fair & Respecting Others [if you have a child with apraxia, or another special need, please remember to follow along on http://www.speakingofapraxia on Mondays for apraxia-specific back-to-school tips beginning 8/5/13.  With a combination of these and the apraxia tips, your family will be ready for success!] Without further adieu…here’s a little refresher on back-to-school stress & …

The Teacher is Talking: Establishing Rules for Summer

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: kidssummerprogram.com) We try to be timely and topical here on “The Teacher is Talking,” so with that in mind, I’d like to share with you a little glimpse of our Sunday morning family meeting.  The topic:  summer rules and expectations.  Kate, my 2nd grader and her little sister, Kelly (kindergarten) affectionately refer to themseleves as “red-year-olds,” are sitting around our round kitchen table grasping at breakfast items, lifing their skinny little bottoms up out of their chairs when my husband and I locked eyes across the table.  “I think it’s time to talk about summer rules and expectations,” he grumbled.  That got the red-year-olds attention.  They sat down and looked at their daddy, “What do you mean?”  “He means,” I pause and look to the girls, “That summer is not going to be a free for all.  We’ll have rules, boundaries…but also some fun.”  The four of us mapped out some summer rules (we’ll call them expectations–it sounds less jail-like that way) and some fun challenges…as well as rewards/fun things …

Apraxia Monday: Staying *Focused* on Daily Routines

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: http://www.thefocusfoundation.org) Today I would like to introduce a new resource:  The Focus Foundation (http://www.thefocusfoundation.org/FF/index.php).  It’s goal–to identify and help children who have X and Y Variations, Dyslexia and/or Developmental Dyspraxia (also called childhood apraxia of speech/CAS/apraxia).  They focus on bringing awareness to the “forgotten child.”  I am honored to be invited to speak at their third annual Atypical Learner’s Conference in Annapolis, MD.  My topic:  apraxia, of course!  But as we all know, apraxia is more than just apraxia, it’s a big ball of wax.  So, to narrow it down a bit, I will be speaking on innovative ways in working with CAS.  Sounds like fun…and a bit of of a challenge! When I think of innovation, what comes to mind is technology.  Nothing needs to be fancy here, no siree…but fun, hands-on, interactive and motor-based and parent involved speech practice.  (In fact, there may be a little technology if you go the route of an iPad for speech apps).  If you are a fan of Speaking of Apraxia (Woodbine House, 2012), …

Apraxia Monday: Interview with Melanie Feller, CCC-SLP

By Leslie Lindsay I am excited to introduce Melanie Feller, CCC-SLP to “Apraxia Monday.”  Melanie’s article, “7 Common Myths of Childhood Apraxia of Speech” recently appeared on Special Education Advisor http://www.specialeducationadvisor.com/7-common-myths-of-childhood-apraxia-of-speech-cas/ and featured on PediaStaff as a “Worth Repeating” article.  Melanie hails from New Jersey and is currently in Oregon for a professional opportunity.  She continues to practice pediatric speech-language pathology in both locations.  L4K:  When and how did you get interested in the field of pediatric speech pathology?   Can you tell us a bit about your educational background?  How long have you been a practicing SLP?  (image source: http://www.upwardaz.org/speech-therapy/.  This is not a photo of Melanie or her practice.  The author(s) have no relationship with this company or individuals).  Melanie, CCC-SLP: As a senior in college. I was a history major, interested in anything but history, and desperately worried about what I would go to graduate school for.  After discovering a book on graduate schools, I came across “communication disorders” in a list of majors, and decided to do some research.  The information I …

The Teacher is Talking: Let’s Talk About Talent

By Leslie Lindsay When I used to work as a R.N. at the Child-Adolescent Treatment Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota I often facilitated educational groups.  Aside from the fact that I really enjoyed these groups, we often would pose questions to the kids (patients) that could be a little tough to answer.  Here are some examples that come to mind: 1)  If you could have another name other than your own, what would you choose and why?  2)  Name one thing you are good at. Okay…the one I am focusing on today is this last one.  One. Thing. You.  Are.  Good.  At.  This particular question gets to the heart of the matter quickly: Self-esteem.  I find this question i smuch  easier for younger kids to answer than older ones.  For example, this past week I volunteered to be a Room Mother at my 6yo’s kindergarten Valentine’s party.  I read a book to the kiddos about happiness and loving oneself.  Then I went around the room and ask for students to share what they …