All posts tagged: kids

The Teacher is Talking: The Galloping Greedy Gimmes

By Leslie Lindsay (image source: amazon.com 12.11.12) The other night, my husband and I were reading our customary bedtime stories with our daughters, ages 5 and 7.  The story: Santa Bear by Stan and Jan Berenstian.  In it, young Brother and Sister Bear are totally completely bedazzeled by all of the holiday hype.  They have a list for Santa Bear a mile long and can’t stop talking about all of the great things they are going to get.  Until Brother Bear oh-so-mature reminds Sister Bear that if she scales her list back, she may actually get something on her list.  Santa Bear doesn’t like greedy cubs, after all.  Sounds familiar?  I have been victim of a couple of greedy little cubs, myself.  In fact, earlier today I scurried about the bustling ‘burbs of Chicagoland attempting to track down the latest and greatest Santa wish: a drum (?!?) and one of those animal hats with the long paw mittens.  I wasn’t going to succumb till I remembered just how magical it felt when I was a …

The Teacher is on Vacation: Cross-Cultural Book List

By Leslie Lindsay The teacher may be on summer vacation, but that doesn’t mean you–or your kiddo(s)–have to stop learning, right?!  Exactly.  I was hoping you’d feel that way. But don’t worry, it doesn’t have to be all gloom and doom.  Summer is a great time to get some reading in–for parents and kids alike.  You can go the typical route and read all of the Caldecott Medal Winners or your child’s summer book list, or you go with the International Reading Association (IRA)’s suggested list of Notable Books for a Global Society [Awards].  Wow…this is a category I am not familiar with.  Thought you’d appreciate the heads-up, too.  You can access the list, dating back to the late 1990’s at http://www.clrsig.org/nbgs.php Here are a few to get you started… PICTURE BOOKS:  Minji’s Salon by Eun-lee Choung (Kane/Miller Press, 2008) Chavela and the Magic Bubble by Monica Brown (Clarion Press, 2010) The Forever Forest: Kids Save a Tropical Forest by Joy Pratt-Serafini (Dawn Publications, 2008) (image retrieved from Amazon, 6.25.12) INTERMEDIATE TITLES:  Hachiko:  The True …

In My Brain Today: The Kids Are Wearing Me Out!

By Leslie Lindsay Today, we have an interview with Summer Sleuth and Worn Out Mom.  Summer Sleuth is on location chatting with Leslie Lindsay, mother of two (ages 5 and 7) in a southwestern ‘burb in the Chicagoland area. Summer Sleuth:  The kids are home from school this summer.  What have you got planned? Worn Out Mom:  We have a fun summer planned!  This week, the girls are in horseback riding camp for two hours.  Next week, it’s VBS at the old preschool.  The week after that, they go to Door County with their grandparents.  Later in July, we have Safety Town and art camp, plus some day camps at the YMCA.  Summer Sleuth:  Sounds like you are really staying busy.  Worn Out Mom:  Yes, we have to!  Without things to do, the girls go bonkers.  Then I do…which isn’t a pretty thing. Summer Sleuth:  Tell us about a typical day for you all. Worn Out Mom:   Well, it all starts with the early morning wake-up call from my oldest daughter (7 years).  She is an early riser. Really …

In My Brain Today: Getting my Feet Wet…Again.

By Leslie Lindsay I haven’t quite gotten my summer feet yet.  You see, mentally I am still stuck in March–maybe early April.  Why?!  I am not really sure.  Time has a way of sneaking up on you–damn, that linear time thing!  So, when my darling daughters said good-bye to the school year and hello to summer, I wasn’t quite ready. My skin is still painfully white, speckled with cellulite and my toenails are definitely in a need of a coat some bright sunny shade.  I have no idea where the pool bag is hiding (well, I do now) and my legs are still a bit, well…amazonian. Any “good” mom would have been joyfully counting down the days till summer break, scouring the house for all of the essential pool items–perhaps even making a trip to the store  (ahem, Target) for new summer accourements and just waiting, waiting for that last day of school so the kids could go to the pool. Alas, I didn’t really do anything in preparation of the last day of school.  …

A Little Literacy, Please: Alice Wonders about Science & Fiction

By Leslie Lindsay You have probably heard of her, too.  Alison Gopnik, a world-renown developmental psychologist who studied at the University of Oxford and now teaches at the University of California-Berkeley has penned such parenting books as The Scientist in the Crib (Harper, 2000) and The Philosophical Baby: What Children’s Minds Tell Us About Truth, Love, and the Meaning of Life (Picador, 2010)   What you might not know is her favorite childhood books were Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll.  As an empirical developmental psychologist, it was no wonder  (ha) that Ms. Gopnik identified with Alice’s character.  “I was Alice”  I shared her name, long hair, and dreamy absentmindedness.  I had a preference for logic and imagination over common sense.  I too, was bewildered by the blindness of grown-ups, esxpecially their failure to recognize that children were smarter than they were.”  Alison Gopnik continues to explain in All I Ever Needed to Know I Learned from a Children’s Book (Roaring Book Press, 2009) that Alice in Wonderland is the link between logic …