All posts tagged: woodbine house

Apraxia Monday: Excerpt from Chapter 8: What you Can do At Home

By Leslie Lindsay This may very well be the chapter/excerpt you have been waiting for!  Get ready to be inspired to help your child with some fun, and practical speech-inducing exercises at home.  It may be the most fun “homework” session yet.  This comes from Chapter 8 of “Speaking of Apraxia” (Woodbine House, March 2012). This chapter is about learning how to help your child overcome apraxia of speech in a natural environment: your home and community.  Here are a few ideas to get you started:  Have a family game night. Traditional  favorites will do the trick. The speech payoffs here: turn-taking, counting, requesting, being a good sport, and other communication opportunities. Visit your public library. Let your child find some books of interest and then read them to her. Speech payoff: child-directed learning, introduction to new vocabulary, 1:1 time with you in which you are modeling pronunciation and articulation. You might even hear some sounds or word approximations from your child! Experience and connect with nature.  Speech payoff: identify and describe what you see, hear, and smell. Think holistically—this is more than just a walk in the park. …

Apraxia Monday: Excerpt from Chapter 8–Assessing Alternative Treatments for CAS

By Leslie Lindsay Here is an excerpt from Chapter 8: Fish Oil, Diet, Horses, Music & More:  Complimentary Alternative Medical Approaches (CAM) to Childhood Apraxia of Speech in “Speaking of Apraxia,” (Woodbine House, March 2012). Does “Nontraditional” Therapy Do Any Good [for children with CAS]?! Sometimes you will find scientific research that supports the treatment claims you hear or read about regardingCAMproducts, but sometimes you won’t. Many folks will ask, “So, if it’s not scientific, why bother?” It’s been my experience that parents want to know what else may help their child. Since we live in a society in which “more” sometimes equates to “better,” why stop at “just” speech therapy? Knowing about—even trying—additional therapies or remedies gives hope to parents whose kids are struggling. For children with CAS alone, it is just as beneficial to work with them on a frequent, intense basis to remediate symptoms associated with CAS. If your child has additional concerns, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) provides options to augment more traditional therapy. For instance, one parent in my Small …

Apraxia Monday: “Speaking of Apraxia” Excerpt Chapter 7

By Leslie Lindsay Here we are–back again to Monday (sigh).  Funny how that linear time thing works, huh?  I thought we’d plow right ahead where we left off before the launch of the book with another excerpt, this one is of Chapter 7:  All About Speech Therapy–Methods best suited to kids with apraxia. (From Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech, March 2012 Woodbine House).  Therapy Strategies Before we get into the nitty-gritty details of therapy strategies for CAS in particular, it’s good to know that there are two main types of approaches to speech therapy in general: 1)    The Bottom-up Approach. The SLP introduces easy to hard (simple to more complex) sounds/words such as vowels (V), as in “oh;” consonant-vowel (CV), as in “me;” vowel-consonant (VC), as in “up;” and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC), as in “mom.” 2)   The Hierarchical Approach. The SLP starts where the child is presently performing; that is, she starts with what the child can say already. Here, you will find various therapy strategies with a brief definition: Therapy …

Apraxia Monday: The book has launched

By Leslie Lindsay It’s been a long time coming.  Close to 4 years, in fact.  I set out to write a book–albeit–a bit relunctly at first on a topic very unfamiliar to me: childhood apraxia of speech (CAS, or just “apraxia”).  When my daughter was just 2 years, 6 months old we were puzzled as to why she wasn’t talking like all of the other children her age.  She was quiet.  She was sweet.  She was smart.  So, why would something as simple as talking be such a challenging feat for my little sprite? Sure, we understood most of what she needed–a grunt here, a gesture there, a soulful stare.  We knew when she needed to be held, when she wanted a snack or a drink.  But we never actually heard her say, “I’m hungry” till much later than typical. When my daughter was diagnosed with CAS in 2007, I had no idea what it was, let alone how I could help my daughter.  Well….fast-forward 5 years and I sure know a heck of a lot …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 6 Excerpt

By Leslie Lindsay An excerpt from “Speaking of Apraxia:  A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech” (Woodbine House, March 2012). 6 So What Caused All of This? Theories and Medical Diagnoses Related to CAS You’d like to blame someone, anyone, for the misfortunate combination of luck and biology that lead to your child having Childhood Apraxia of Speech. But chances are, there is nothing or no one who can take the blame. There is a lot of conflicting information out there about what causes CAS. To date, the professionals can’t agree on a cause—but there are lots of theories. I am certainly no expert in CAS theory, so if you really have an interest in this topic, I urge you to seek out additional resources. The Nuts and Bolts of This Chapter A review of the ASHA 2007 Ad Hoc Technical Document on Childhood Apraxia of Speech, which summarized what is known about CAS and advanced three theories about is causes. . Familial factors, infectious diseases, and medically based diagnoses that may involved with …

Special Edition: Speaking of Apraxia is HERE!!

By Leslie Lindsay This just in:  Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech has arrived!!  I knew the book was scheduled for release Wedneday, March 28th but that as the author I would be receiving the book slightly ahead of schedule.  And it wasn’t able to be delivered to my home address, due to the need for the books–all 100–to be signed for.  So, I dutifully gave my publisher the address to my hubby’s office and waited on pins and needles to hear of the delivery. One day, about two weeks ago, my darling husband had said in passing “I can’t wait to open up those boxes and see it for myself.”  “Oh no, you don’t!” I responded.  “You will bring those books home and let me have the first look.  You will not–and I repeat–not–be opening that box at work!”  He grinned.  I wasn’t sure if he was teasing, or he just enjoyed seeing me get all fired up.  Alas, the books arrived yesterday around 1:30pm.  All 100 of them.  Each …

Write on, Wednesday: What a Writer Needs

By Leslie Lindsay Even good writers need a break.  Bad ones, too.  Writing it hard work.  You may beg to differ, especially if you are not a writer.  “How hard can it be to sit and think and type?” you may wonder.  Oh, but it is.  Let me explain: To be a writer, one has to be creative.  Then, one has to channel that creativity into something meaningful.  Read: organized. So, to be a writer, one has to be organized and creative?  Well, yes.  At least to some degree.  (And don’t those two qualifiers sound a bit like an oxymoron?).  Exactly. A writer also has to have time.  Time to ponder.  Time to process.  Time to live life.  Time to be out in the “real world,” (because good writing is based upon experience, and not just assumption).  A writer needs time to read.  Because good writing is often the product of good reading (and points one and two above).  But most of all, a writer must have time to write. A writer must also have …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 5–Getting the CAS Diagnosis/Initial Reactions

By Leslie Lindsay (An excerpt from Speaking of Apraxia: A Paren’ts Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  Chapter 5: “Getting the Diagnosis and Coping with Your Initial Reactions”).    You may have been searching for years for some term to identify why your child isn’t talking like every other child. Perhaps you weren’t that concerned in the first place, but took your child to a speech-language pathologist because your friends, your mother, or a concerned neighbor or teacher urged you to. In either case, you now have a word to describe the phenomenon: Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). What’s next? Common Reactions If it took you awhile to arrive at a diagnosis, you may be feeling like your competence as a parent has been challenged.   “Gosh, I knew there was something wrong, why wouldn’t (or couldn’t) anyone tell me what it was?!”  You may feel some resentment toward any professionals you consulted who shooed you away, assuring you everything was “fine.” “I knew I was right! Those doctors were so incompetent. Their lack of competency …

Apraxia Monday: Assessment and Diagnosis, an excerpt from Chapter 4

By Leslie Lindsay Here’s chapter 4 from Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  Here, you’ll get a glimpse of what it’s like to go to the very first (initial assessment) appointment with your child, what the SLP is doing and why…read on to learn more. At the Appointment : You’re there. You might be excited, nervous, indifferent, or in complete denial. Depending on the type of SLP you have—and how she or he prefers to work—you’ll likely see a combination approach to formal and informal testing at your first appointment. If your SLP is completely informal, you may be skeptical of his or her approach. “How can playing with Play-Doh and blowing bubbles really help?” you may wonder. Your SLP should have enough toys to hold your child’s attention for a good hour or so. You’ll want to feel like you just walked into a toy superstore. But on another note, it should be organized and well-maintained, and not too overwhelming. A good SLP will know this and perhaps only …

Apraxia Monday: Chapter 3 Excerpt

By Leslie Lindsay If you have been following along recently, you know that Speaking of Apraxia: A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech will be released later this month.  It’s been a long–but overall good–journey in which I have been reading, writing, and revising to get this book into the hands of parents of children with CAS.  As a “count-down-to-release-day,” I am offering some excerpts of the book.  This one is on chapter 3:  Finding Help When You Suspect CAS.  Here goes: “As first-time parents, we didn’t want to appear “delinquent,” so when Kate was 15 months old, exactly, we headed to the doctor (the same one who delivered her) for her scheduled well-child check-up. I say “we,” because both doting parents were off work for the occasion. We came armed with our wiggly daughter; along with thoughts, questions, and toddler antics to relate to our doctor. Kate was meeting all of her developmental milestones right on target. Except one: talking. She had only one word, “Hi.” I was excited that she had such a …